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Category: Programs

WHAT’S HAPPENING…BEHIND THE SCENES

Museum Collaborates with Local Programs to Inspire ARTFul Living

Current research shows that participation in the arts can help people develop and retain skills and live happier lives. From improving memory and cognition to stimulating our brains to produce the “reward” hormone dopamine, arts activities can enhance well-being. Under the heading Artful Living, educators at the Beach Museum of Art lead a number of arts activities tailored to adult audiences, including those with special needs. They collaborate with local organizations to provide to senior living facilities and the following programs:

  • The museum provides space and programs serving senior facilities for OSHER, a nation-wide life-long learning program for those aged 55 and older, and participates in K-State’s Center on Aging Lecture Series at Meadowlark Hills Retirement Community.
  • SPEEDY PD Art is part of the community-wide Parkinson’s Support Group program which meets at Meadowlark Hills. The Museum provides an annual art talk and weekly art classes during the summer. One benefit of making art for those with Parkinson’s is the production of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that becomes depleted in Parkinson’s patients.  Many of the artworks produced over the summer serve as prizes for the Speedy PD benefit race held in August.
  • ARTFul Memories at Meadowlark Hills Retirement Community is a Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) based program.  On the fourth Wednesday of the month persons with dementia and their care partners are invited to attend an interactive facilitated discussion of art images.  The Meadowlark Memory Program is free and open to the public.
  • Museum educators provide outreach and tours for Big Lakes Developmental Center.

Please contact Kathrine Schlageck or Kim Richards at the museum for more information at 785-532-7718. If you are interested in learning more about Meadowlark Hills public programs for memory and Parkinson’s support contact Michelle Haub at 785-323-3899.

Family Holiday Workshop 12/2/17 1:30-3

Don’t miss!
Family Holiday Workshop 
Saturday, December 2, 2017, 1:30-3 p.m.
Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art 
701 Beach Lane (14th and Anderson), Manhattan, KS 66506.
Create holiday cards and decorations inspired by Mexican traditions. Cost is $5 per child and must be accompanied by an adult. Special half price for Military families. Reservations are not required.

– Alibrijes-style animal ornaments
– Mexican mirror ornaments
– Paper lanterns and luminarias
– Nochebuena flowers (poinsettias)
– Holiday papel picado
– Woven paper stars
– Refreshments served: Mexican hot chocolate, Jumex, and Mexican treats

Major programming support is provided by the Greater Manhattan Community Foundation’s Lincoln and Dorothy Deihl Community Grant Program.

This program is inspired by the exhibition “Fronteras/Frontiers” on view October 7, 2017 – April 1, 2018.

Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art
701 Beach Lane (14th and Anderson), Manhattan, KS 66506
785-532-7718 | beach.k-state.edu
Tues., Wed., Fri. 10-5; Thurs. 10-8; Sat. 11-4

Ganz Artist Talk at the Beach Museum of Art

Artist talk by Sayaka Ganz
Thursday, November 9, 5:30 p.m.

Ganz will give a talk regarding her current exhibition at the Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art, Reclaimed Creations: Sayaka Ganz. There will be a small reception following the talk with time to look at the exhibition, if you haven’t already had the chance or would like to take another look at this amazing work.

Reclaimed Creations: Sayaka Ganz

Sayaka Ganz’s sculptures of birds, animals, and marine life incorporate discarded plastic objects that have become dangerous to wild creatures. Her works in this exhibition foreground the need to rethink human use and disposal of objects in a world driven by convenience. Ganz has said, “I try to give new life to discarded objects.…I get my inspiration from nature and from the movement that we find in nature.” She describes her reuse of the found materials as “3D impressionism”: The recycled objects appear like brush strokes, separated at close proximity but visibly unified at a distance.

A resident of Indiana, Ganz grew up living in Japan, Brazil, and Hong Kong. She holds a master of fine arts degree in sculpture from Bowling Green State University in Ohio. Commissions include a series of four marine life sculptures at the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California. The tour of “Sayaka Ganz: Reclaimed Creations” is produced by David J. Wagner, L.L.C., David J. Wagner, Ph.D., curator and tour director.”

This exhibition is made possible in part by a grant from the Caroline Peine Charitable Foundation/The Manhattan Fund, Bank of America, N.A., Trustee.