Kansas State University


Beach Blog

Tag: Free and Open to the Public

Art in Motion, a celebration of art

Mark your calendars!

October 7, 2017 Noon-4:00pm

Beach Museum of Art Parking Lot and Galleries

Live painting performance by artist Enrico Isamu Ōyama at 2:00 p.m. In Ōyama’s live painting performance he responds in the moment to surrounding people, sounds, atmosphere, and energy. Duration: 30 minutes.

Make your own print in GraficoMovil, a mobile printmaking studio/gallery. Created by artist Artemio Rodríguez.

Action art activities for all ages, EVERYONE’S WELCOME!

Art in Motion, a celebration of art in the museum parking lot.

Concurrent with “Harmony at the ‘Hatt” music festival in Triangle Park, Aggieville district.

Sunny 102.5 will broadcast live from the event

“You Gotta Have Art” Gallery Walk with Don Lambert

“You Gotta Have Art” Gallery Walk with Don Lambert
Thursday, November 3, 2016
Gallery walks will take place at 5:30 and 6:15 p.m.
Preregistration required. Call 785-532-7718 or email beachart@k-state.edu.

Don Lambert, Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, Kansas State University, 1972, was a young reporter at the Ottawa Herald in Ottawa, Kansas, when he discovered Elizabeth Layton’s drawings in a college freshman drawing show at the Ottawa University student union. Recognizing her extraordinary talent and singular artistic vision, he curated and toured an exhibition of her work throughout Kansas, and introduced her art to museum curators all over the country. Seize this opportunity to hear firsthand accounts about the artist and her works from her close friend and advocate.

Elizabeth Layton Geraniums, 1985
Elizabeth Layton
Geraniums, 1985

Elizabeth “Grandma” Layton: You Gotta Have Art is on view through January 7, 2017.

Elizabeth Layton Untitled (business business business, you gotta have art), 1991
Elizabeth Layton
Untitled (business business business, you gotta have art), 1991

The Beach Museum of Art’s twentieth anniversary theme, “You Gotta Have Art,” was inspired by the words printed on caps worn by Elizabeth Layton and her second husband in many of her self-portraits. The caps were gifts from her friend Don Lambert. The succinct phrase encapsulates how art was a positive force in Elizabeth Layton’s life. Her drawings examined universal human experiences such as aging, death, social injustice, and love through the lens of her own life and body.