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Before Leaving K-State Employee Checklist

This does not apply to retirees, emeritus, or employees who have taken a K-State course.

240 days after you leave K-State, access to your K-State Office 365 account is discontinued and any data you have on the central computer systems and backups are deleted. 

Do these tasks before you leave K-State, or as soon as you receive an email notice that access to your data will be removed soon.

  • Copy all email messages and folders you want to keep.

    Storage options include:

    • Your personal computer
    • An external storage device
    • Internet storage services
  • Forward business-related e-mail – Forward business related email to department head or department designee.
  • Migrate to a new email service – Options include, but are not limited to, Gmail, Hotmail, Yahoo Mail, etc.
  • Review mailing lists – Subscribe from your new email address for lists you want to keep. Then unsubscribe your K-State address from all lists. Current employment is a requirement for some list subscriptions, so not all lists may be available post-employment. If you have questions, check with the mailing-list owner to verify if you can continue to receive email.
  • Copy any files you are entitled to keep, including:
    • Files on your office computer
    • Files on the central Unix system
    • Files on your departmental or central file server
    • Your personal webpages
  • Transfer ownership of shared Qualtrics surveys – If you have Qualtrics surveys that are shared, request that the IT Help Desk transfer ownership of the survey(s) to the appropriate individual.
  • Transfer ownership of shared group accounts – If you have shared group accounts, transfer ownership of the group account to another individual in the group.
  • Remove software that belongs to K-State – Remove software on your personal computer that was received under a Kansas State University site license or volume-purchase agreement, including but not limited to the following list:
  • Have you been a staff person living in a residence hall? Point your computer back to the Microsoft Windows Update Service.
    1. Download K-State’s SUS Removal file and save it to your computer’s desktop.
    2. Double-click the “SUSRemoval.exe” file on your desktop. This will reset your computer to point to the Microsoft Windows Update Service.

    If you don’t, your computer will stop getting Microsoft updates, including security updates, and it will be more vulnerable to malware and hackers.

  • Continue to change your K-State eID password – Change your eID password when required every 180 days. It keeps your K-State eID current, so you can sign in to systems for which you’re authorized, including eProfile, KSIS, K-State Online, HRIS, etc.

Before leaving K-State student check list

Do these tasks before you leave K-State, or as soon as you receive an email notice that access to your data will be removed soon.

  • Email – If you took one or more K-State courses, your email account, messages, and folders will continue at K-State long-term.
  • Review mailing lists – Delete any mailing lists you don’t want to keep.
  • Copy any files you are entitled to keep, including:
    • Office 365 OneDrive files
    • Files on your office computer
    • Files on the central Unix system
    • Files on your departmental or central file server
    • Your personal web pages

    After 30 days, your data is deleted from the central computer systems and backups. After 1 year, your OneDrive files and folders will be deleted and will not be recoverable.

  • Remove software that belongs to K-State – Remove software on your personal computer that was received under a Kansas State University site license or volume-purchase agreement, including but not limited to the following:
  • Students in residence halls: Reset Microsoft Windows Update Service – Point your computer back to the Microsoft Windows Update Service.
    1. Download K-State’s SUS Removal file and save it to your computer’s desktop.
    2. Double-click the “SUSRemoval.exe” file on your desktop. This will reset your computer to point to the Microsoft Windows Update Service.

    If you don’t, your computer will stop getting Microsoft updates, including security updates, and it will be more vulnerable to malware and hackers.

  • Continue to change your K-State eID password – Change your eID password when required every 180 days. It keeps your K-State eID current, so you can sign in to systems for which you’re authorized, including eProfile, KSIS, K-State Online, HRIS, etc.

 

Chief Information Security Officer candidate interviews

The next round of candidates for the Chief Information Security Officer will be on campus March 14 and March 16. Application materials for each candidate and a link to the candidate feedback form is available on the CISO website. There are two opportunities to meet with each candidate.

Wed., Mar. 14 – Chad Currier, Manager Information Security, Novant Health

  • Open forum – 10:15 a.m. in 146G/H in the Unger Complex
  • SIRT forum and distributed IT staff – 1 p.m. in 146G Unger Complex

Fri., Mar. 16 – Homer Manila, Network Security Admin/InfoSec Engineer/Cyber Security Engineer III, American University, Washington DC

  • Open forum – 10:15 a.m. in 146G/H in the Unger Complex
  • SIRT forum and distributed IT staff – 1 p.m. in 146G Unger Complex

You can also join the open forums via Zoom.

Please join us in interviewing the CISO candidates. Videos will be posted to the CISO website.

 

Dec. 19: Retirement celebration for Beth and Jay Alloway

After a collective 90+ years of service, Beth and Jay Alloway will retire from Information Technology Services on December 31, 2017. A retirement celebration will be held in the Hemisphere Room of Hale Library on December 19 from 9-10:30 a.m., remarks will be at 9:30 a.m.

Beth has been employed at K-State for more than 46 1/2 years. Her position has evolved from key punch operator to overseeing access to administrative systems. She works with every individual who needs access to administrative systems. She monitors and resolves high-level security access requests and has been the go-to person for resolving eID issues.

Jay began his career in the Computing Center in 1969. He was appointed to the position by Elizabeth Unger.  He earned his B.S. in Electrical Engineering in 1970 and has held numerous positions over the last 48 years from systems analyst to systems programmer to Assistant Director to Acting Associate Director.

 

Software requests due Dec. 1 for computing labs, InfoCommons for fall 2018

The Information Technology Assistance Center is currently taking requests for software additions on the computers in the centrally supported technology classrooms, the K-State InfoCommons and the university computing labs (1 Dickens Hall, 001 Seaton Hall and the K-State Union Computing lab). The deadline for software requests is Dec. 1.

Software requested must be free to use, or the requesting department must provide the licensing. When a department provides the licensing, iTAC will work with the department to determine the number of licenses needed and monitor compliance. The list of software in the technology classrooms is available from http://www.k-state.edu/its/classrooms/software/index.html . The current list of software in the computer labs is at k-state.edu/its/labs/software.html.

If you have any software you would like added or have questions, contact Kevin Shippy, kshippy@k-state.edu, 785-532-3343.

Information Technology Services addressing the wifi vulnerability

Information Technology Services is addressing the vulnerability, referred to as KRACK (Key Reinstallation Attack). The vulnerability affects WiFi connectivity using the WPA2 encryption method. The hacker could use this vulnerability on an open, unencrypted network to retrieve confidential information including credit card information, social security numbers, bank account information, etc.

The K-State current Aruba infrastructure already has the protection in place for all of the vulnerabilities except for 802.11R, which is not enabled on our controllers at this time.

While protections are in place, K-Staters need to ensure that their devices (smartphones, laptops, etc.) have all the current patches and update as patches become available. This vulnerability also underscores the need for K-Staters to use the authenticated networks on campus including KSU Wireless, KSU Housing and Eduroam.  When connecting from outside our network, K-Staters need to use the virtual private network (VPN).

The open KSU Guest wireless is unencrypted and should be avoided. The same is true when using open wireless networks at local restaurants, fast food operations, hotels, when shopping etc.

For assistance, contact the IT Help Desk at 785-532-7722.

Free community shred day

The K-State Credit Union is hosting a free community shred day 9-11 a.m, Saturday, Oct. 7, at 601 McCall Rd (East Branch).

Take advantage of this free service and safely dispose of your sensitive paper documents. Stay one step ahead of criminals that try to obtain this information through various means. While you are there, you can also bring a food donation for the Flint Hills BreadBasket.

For more information, see the K-State Credit Union announcement.

Protect yourself online: Follow these 6 National Cyber Security Alliance recommendations

Follow these six National Cyber Security Alliance recommendations to better protect yourself online and make the Internet more secure for everyone:

  • Tips for staying safe onlineStrengthen each online account or device. Enable the strongest authentication tools available. A strong password is the first step to protecting yourself. Other strategies might include biometrics, security keys, or unique one-time codes sent to your mobile device.
  • Keep a clean machine. Make sure all software on Internet-connected devices — including PCs, laptops, smartphones, and tablets — are updated regularly to reduce the risk of malware infection.
  • Personal information is like money. Value it. Protect it. Information about you, such as purchase history or location, has value — just like money. Be thoughtful about who receives that information and how it’s collected by apps or websites.
  • When in doubt, throw it out. Cybercriminals often use links to try to steal your personal information. Even if you know the source, if something looks suspicious, delete it.
  • Share with care. Think before posting about yourself and others online. Consider what a post reveals, who might see it, and how it could be perceived now and in the future.
  • Own your online presence. Set the privacy and security settings on websites to your comfort level for information sharing. It’s okay to limit how and with whom you share information.

Source: Educause Campus Security Awareness Campaign

If you have any questions about your online safety, contact the IT Help Desk, helpdesk@k-state.edu, 532-7722.

Reminder about phishing scams

The Dec. 22 email that appeared to be from President Myers is one more example of the need to be vigilant before responding to an email, clicking a link, or opening an attachment. The email appeared to be legitimate. A point of clarification though is communications from President Myers would more than likely be posted in K-State Today. Also when verifying the “reply to” email address, there was an additional “from” email address not associated with K-State (see the highlighted email below).

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U.S. CERT (U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team) reminds us to remain on the alert and when in doubt, delete the email, avoid clicking on a link and do not open suspicious attachments. When in doubt, DELETE.

In response to the latest phishing scam, Information Technology Services and Communications and Marketing have:

  • Blocked the URL for the email on the K-State network
  • Sent the attachment to Trend Micro for analysis. The attachment was deemed malicious and Trend Micro is preventing the attachment from being downloaded.
  • Posted notices about the scam throughout campus.