Prepare Kansas

Tag: family communication plan

Don’t wait — communicate

The Prepare Kansas online challenge* takes place each year during September.  September is also National Preparedness Month (NPM). The month finishes big on September 30 with a national day of action, National PrepareAthon! Day.

National Preparedness Month 2015
National Preparedness Month 2015

One of the challenge tasks for Week 1 is to complete a family or workplace communication plan to use in the event of a disaster and communicate the details with everyone who needs to know about it.

If you aren’t sure what to include in your plan, check out this information and the resources at ready.gov

We’ve also posted some helpful links here on the blog.

* There is still time! Take steps ahead of disaster and register by September 6 at http://bit.ly/1pwiiFE

 

 

Today’s the day — the 2015 Prepare Kansas online challenge starts today!

Welcome to the 2015 Prepare Kansas challenge. The program focuses on a few activities every week during September. For example: access alerts and warnings, develop communication plans, assemble or update supplies, and drill or practice an emergency response.

Challenge activities for September 1 – 6 are to:

  • complete a family or workplace communication plan to use in the event of a disaster and communicate the details with everyone who needs to know about it, and
  • purchase a bin, bag, or box and add 5 items to your emergency supply kit.

Throughout the week we will post helpful information about how to accomplish each of the challenge tasks.

Haven’t signed up for 2015 Prepare Kansas online challenge yet? There is still time! Take steps ahead of disaster and register by September 6 at http://bit.ly/1pwiiFE

Family communication during and after a disaster

Texting by Allysa Hillaby from The Noun Project

Most of us probably spend the majority of our waking hours away from home, at least on Monday through Friday. That means that when a disaster strikes family members are likely to be scattered throughout the community at school, work, or other activities.

Making a plan now for how you will communicate with one another in different situations is important. In the Helpful Links section at the right is an example of a family communication plan for parents and children. Here is another example of a family communication plan.

Regardless of the format you use for your family communication plan, be sure everyone in your family knows the plan. FEMA provides additional family communication tips here.