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Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Collaborative Research on Sustainable Intensification

Conservation Challenges for Sustainable Intensification of Agriculture in Africa

Figure 1. Cotton grown in Natta village, bordering Ikorongo-Grumeti Game Reserve

Protected areas (PAs) are critical for conservation of species and ecosystems. Since 1990, global terrestrial area designated as PAs has increased more than 50%  (Juffe-Bignoli et al., 2014). While PAs are often criticized for negatively impacting the livelihoods of marginalized rural communities, contrasting dynamics have emerged outside PAs. Increasing employment opportunities, resource availability, and improved market access in PA buffers have led to higher rates of population growth in these areas compared to other rural areas (Wittemyer et al., 2008). As human populations expand and encroach upon natural habitats, many animal species face increasing competition with people for resources and space, often resulting in habitat loss and degradation. The effectiveness of PAs is also impacted by what takes place outside their boundaries (Hansen and DeFries, 2007). Species such as wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) use areas outside reserves for their annual migration, while African elephants (Loxodonta africana) range widely and routinely leave protected areas. Agricultural conversion and urban expansion disrupt the wildlife corridors and restrict animal populations within PAs. As a result, some species, such as the African elephant, are coming into increasing conflict with people. Human-elephant conflict takes many forms, from crop raiding to infrastructure damage, and can cause injury or death to people and/or elephants. This presents a critical challenge for PA management and food security of local communities.

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‘The Story of the Green Revolution: Where are the Women?’ Fulbright Senior Scholar to present seminar on May 3

Join us on May 3, 2018 in 137 Waters Hall at 3pm for a seminar by Fulbright Senior Scholar Dr. Patrick Kilby.

The Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Collaborative Research on Sustainable Intensification (SIIL) at Kansas State University has served as the host for Fulbright Senior Scholar Dr. Kilby during the 2018 spring semester as he researches gender inclusion in the K-State Innovation Labs. Dr. Kilby’s seminar will highlight his work on the inclusion of women in agriculture.


Click here
to download a copy of the seminar announcement.

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Notes from the Field: SIIL – Africa RISING Visit in Tanzania

The Director of the Feed the Future Sustainable Intensification Innovation Lab (SIIL), Dr. Vara Prasad, and USAID Bureau for Food Security Senior Sustainable Agricultural Systems Advisor, Dr. Jerry Glover, are visiting Africa RISING and SIIL projects in Tanzania this week to observe the progress being made in the field and identify opportunities for further collaboration. They are accompanied by one of the SIIL’s External Advisory Board Members, Dr. Peter Thorne of ILRI, as well as other team members from the SIIL and Africa RISING projects.

Group photo at the Agricultural Research Institute Uyole (ARI Uyole) office in the Mbeya region of Tanzania.

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