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Month: April 2018

Conifer Trees for Kansas – new resource hot off the press!

Are you interested in planting conifers, but you are not sure what to choose? The new Conifer Trees for Kansas publication provides details.

You can download a copy for free. There are color photos on nearly every page. The publication describes landscape evergreens suitable for specific regions in Kansas. Includes botanical and common names, photos, growth rates and dimensions, significant pests, with comments from the authors based on personal observations.

 

 

Stinks… Don’t It! – Wild Garlic Control In Turfgrass

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Garlic has a very distinct and pungent smell, stinks… don’t it!  But did you know there are benefits to eating garlic? It is highly nutritious but has very few low calories, it can help combat sickness, it can reduce blood pressure, and more.

Around Manhattan I have been seeing a lot of wild garlic in lawns. Now don’t go out and eat that wild garlic. We are now talking about the turfgrass weed wild garlic and not the garlic you eat.

Wild garlic (Allium vineale) is more obvious in the winter and early spring because this weed will grow above the turfgrass canopy and is easily noticed. Sometimes it can be easily confused with wild onion and star-of-Bethlehem.

Wild garlic is a perennial bulb that has a grass like appliance. It emerges in late winter and early spring. The leaves are straight and smooth. The way to tell the difference between wild garlic wild onion is by tearing the stem to see if it is hollow or solid. It if is hollow then it is wild garlic. If it is a solid stem then it could be wild onion.

This weed tolerate a wide range of soil conditions but I have noticed it more in low maintenance areas.

Photo credit – Auburn University Turfgrass – http://cses.auburn.edu/turfgrass-management/weed-identification/wild-garlic/

Control of wild garlic in cool-season turfgrass is more difficult then in warm-season turfgrasses.  For fair control use 2,4-D or one of the many combinations of 2,4-D, MCPP and dicamba.  This products have shown to have limited control.  The ester formulations of 2,4-D are more effective than amine formulations.  Applications in the late fall and early spring when there is adequate foliage is best.  To increase uptake, mowing before application may help.

In warm-season turfgrass metsulfuron or metsulfuron + sulfentrazone and sulfosulfuron provide very effective control.  Applying these products in late March early April on a warm day above 50 deg F when there is good soil moisture will increase efficacy.

If you got wild garlic, right now is the time to go out and get it.  Not to mention if you have any other broadleaf weeds you will get some control of those as well!

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Not Your Father’s Knotweed

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

For the past couple years I have posted on prostrate knotweed (Polygonum aviculare) control in turfgrass systems.  Guess what… it is that time of year again.  I have been seeing knotweed germinate all across campus and in areas where turf is thin.  Knotweed can grow in compacted soils where turf can’t survive. So after you get control of that knotweed make sure you aerify to relieve the compaction (Check out my recent post on aerification – http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/new-aerating-your-lawn-ksre-publication/) and get some healthy turfgrass growing.

There are going to be some new products coming to the market soon that we have tested on prostrate knotweed that have shown excellent control.  So keep a lookout for new broadleaf herbicides (Hopefully they will be out either late this year or early next year).  When they hit the market you will hear all about it and next year when I post about knotweed control hopefully they will be released and I can add it to the list!

If you didn’t get your preemerge out in the fall for control and you have a history of knotweed it is time to go out and attack the knotweed and other broadleaf weeds you have lingering around.  These weeds are easier to control now when they are young compared to when they get mature.

Below is the Knotweed Control Turfgrass Selfie Series Video I did last year but here are the take home messages;

  • Early germinating summer annual
  • Likes compacted soils/flooded areas
  • 2,4-D = fair control
  • 2,4-D + triclopyr or dicamba = excellent control
  • metsulfuron can be used in warm-season turf
  • PRE applications must be done in the Fall

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

 

A Homeowner Step-By-Step Buffalograss Lawn Guide

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Buffalograss Lawn Calendar

For more information check out the Buffalograss Lawns Publication at the KSRE Bookstore – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=1447

Buffalograss has become more popular in recent years due to its reputation as a low-maintenance grass. Buffalograss does require less water and fertilizer than our other turfgrasses but often has problems competing with weeds in eastern Kansas. Remember, buffalograss is a low-maintenance lawn and not a “No”-maintenance lawn.

Buffalograss is an open growing grass that will not shade the soil as well as most of our other turfgrasses. Weeds are often the result. A regular mowing schedule can reduce broadleaf weed problems as most broadleaves cannot survive consistent mowing. Those that do either have a rosette growing pattern (dandelions, shepherds purse) or are “creepers” (henbit, chickweed, spurge). Annual grasses such as crabgrass or foxtail can also be a problem. A good weed preventer (prodiamine, pendimethalin or dithiopyr) may be needed prevent problems.

March

Spot treat broadleaf weeds if necessary. The most important treatment for broadleaf weeds should be in late October to early November well after the buffalograss is dormant. Treatments are much more effective then than in the spring as the weeds are smaller and the weeds are sending energy, as well as the herbicide, to the roots. Treatments in March are to take care of any “escapes” missed in the fall spraying. Spray early enough in March that the buffalograss is still dormant. Look at the base of the plants to make sure there is no green. Treat on a day that is 50 degrees F or warmer. Rain or irrigation within 24 hours of application will reduce effectiveness.  Use a combination product such as Trimec, Weed-B-Gon or Weed-Out. Weed Free Zone is also good and will give quicker results under cool conditions.

April

Apply crabgrass preventer between April 1 and April 15, or apply preventer when the eastern redbud is in full bloom. If using a product with prodiamine (Barricade), apply two weeks earlier.  Crabgrass preventers must be watered in before they will work. Avoid using broadleaf herbicides as the buffalograss is greening up as injury can result. The buffalograss will not be killed but growth will slow making the buffalograss less competitive with weeds.

June

Fertilize with 1 lb. of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet during June. More applications will give a deeper green color, but can encourage weeds. If it is felt that a second application is needed, apply in July.

If grubs have been a problem in the past, apply a product containing imidacloprid by mid July. Imidacloprid can be applied as early as mid May if there are problems with billbugs or May beetle grubs. These products kill the grubs before they cause damage. They are effective and safe but must be watered in before they become active. Again, I would only treat if grubs have been a problem in the past. Note that the whole area may not need to be treated. The beetles that lay the eggs for the grubs are attracted to lights and moist soil and those areas are most likely to be infested.

Late-July through August

If you see grub damage, apply a grub killer. If imidacloprid has been applied or if grubs have not been a problem in the past, this should not be necessary. Grub killers must be watered in immediately.

Late October to Early November

Spray for broadleaf weeds if they are a problem. Look carefully as our winter annuals such as chickweed and henbit are small and easily overlooked. Use a product that contains 2,4-D as it increases effectiveness on dandelions. Treat on a day that is at least 50 degrees F. Rain or irrigation within 24 hours reduces effectiveness. Use the rates listed on the label for all products mentioned.

For more information check out the Buffalograss Lawns Publication at the KSRE Bookstore – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=1447

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

A Homeowner Step-by-Step Guide to Bermudagrass and Zoysiagrass Lawns

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Earlier I posted the Homeowner Step-By-Step Guide to Cool-Season Lawns in Kansas so I decided that it would be good to go ahead and get the warm-season lawn calendar out there for everyone that is manageing zoysiagrass, bermudagrass.

The following is a lawn calendar for zoysiagrass and bermudagrass. Buffalograss, also a warm-season grass, but we will cover that separate because the management of buffalograss is a little different then zoysiagrass and bermudagrass.

For more information check out the Zoyisagrass Lawns Publication at the KSRE Bookstore – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=1451

For more information check out the Bermudagrass Lawns Publication at the KSRE Bookstore – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=586

 

Zoysiagrass and Bermduagrass Lawn Calendar

March
Spot treat broadleaf weeds if necessary. Treat on a day that is 50 degrees F or warmer. Rain or irrigation within 24 hours of application will reduce effectiveness.

April
Apply crabgrass preventer between April 1 and April 15, or apply preventer when the eastern redbud is in full bloom. This year we are getting a little warmer sooner but remember this cold snap that we just had would have killed any crabgrass if it had germinated. If using a product with prodiamine (Barricade), apply two weeks earlier. Crabgrass preventers must be watered in before they will start to work.

May – August 15
Fertilize with 1 lb. of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet per application. Follow the recommendations on the bag. More applications will give a deeper green color, but will increase mowing and may lead to thatch buildup with zoysiagrass. Bermudagrass can also have problems with thatch buildup but thatch is less likely with Bermuda than zoysia. Bermudagrass – Use two to four applications. Zoysiagrass – Use one to two applications. Too much nitrogen leads to thatch buildup.

One Application: Apply in June.
Two Applications: Apply May and July.
Three Applications: Apply May, June, and early August.
Four Applications: Apply May, June, July, and early August.

Remember to look and see if you are using a quick release nitrogen source or a slow release nitrogen source.  If you use a quick release source then it is immediately available but only lasts a couple weeks.  Thats why you would have to make a couple of applications like it is listed above.  If you are going to use a slow release source it will tell you on the bag how long the product will last.  Therefore, you might not have to make as many applications.

So generally you want to use a total of 2 to 4lb. of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet per year for bermudagrass and 1 to 2 lb. of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet per year for zoysiagrass.

June
If grubs have been a problem in the past, apply a product containing imidacloprid by mid July. Imidacloprid can be applied as early as mid May if there are problems with billbugs or May beetle grubs. These products kill the grubs before they cause damage. They are effective and safe but must be watered in before they become active. June is a good time to core aerate a warm-season lawn. Core aeration will help alleviate compaction, increase the rate of water infiltration, improve soil air exchange and help control thatch.


Late-July through August
If you see grub damage, apply a grub killer. If Imidacloprid has been applied, this should not be necessary. Grub killers must be watered in immediately.

Late October
Spray for broadleaf weeds if they are a problem. Treat on a day that is at least 50 degrees F. Rain or irrigation within 24 hours reduces effectiveness. Use the rates listed on the label for all products mentioned.

For more information check out the Zoyisagrass Lawns Publication at the KSRE Bookstore – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=1451

For more information check out the Bermudagrass Lawns Publication at the KSRE Bookstore – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=586

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Guess what KS city is listed as #7 in the Top 10 Worst Cities for Weeds and Disease for 2018?

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

As I was looking through some news articles I came across this one that caught my eye.

 “Top 10 Worst Cities for Weeds and Disease in 2018”

I couldn’t wait to click the article and see what the National Association of Landscape Professionals listed as the top 10 worst cities for weeds and disease.  It was also pretty interesting how they came up with these cities.  Check it out!

Guess what KS city is listed as #7?

http://www.kltv.com/story/37912381/weed-watch-the-top-10-worst-cities-for-weeds-and-lawn-disease-in-2018

 

Remembering our pine diseases

(Megan Kennelly, KSU Plant Pathology)

Everything is late-late-late this year, but soon our pine shoots (candles) will be expanding. Pine tip blight is most likely to infect newly-emerging shoots. Dothistroma comes a little later and infects needles. With pine wilt, what we see now is pines that were infected last year and are dead by now. (We need to get those chopped down and chipped/burned ASAP).

Here’s the link to some pine tip blight info  in last year’s summary

Here’s the link for Dothistroma needle blight .

And, of course, don’t forget about PINE WILT. Get those pine wilt trees cut down by May 1 at the latest.

For a summary of all the major pine diseases in one convenient spot, you can download our publication Pine Disease in Kansas.

 

“The grass is always greener” – national media story about sports turf

Green industry professionals often work behind the scenes without much publicity. However, there was a great story this weekend about what goes on behind the scenes at Nationals Park on NPR.

You read the text and see photos here, or click to listen to the recorded interview.

https://www.npr.org/2018/04/07/600482865/the-grass-is-always-greener-at-the-baseball-field

 

 

K-State Radio Network “Plantorama” – Early Cool-Season Lawn Care

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

With spring officially here, homeowners should start paying attention to the condition of their cool-season lawns…especially in view of the dry conditions that persist in this region. Early-season watering of fescue and other cool-season turfgrass is especially important this year, according to K-State turfgrass horticulturist Jared Hoyle. He talks about proper watering and fertility management this week.

Click the link below for K-State Research and Extension Agriculture Today Radio Program “Plantorama” hosted by Eric Atkinson.

Check out the KSRE bookstore more more information on all things turf! – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Category.aspx?id=528&catId=545

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf