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K-State Turfgrass

Month: March 2019

Cut and destroy those pine wilt infected trees ASAP

(Megan Kennelly, KSU Plant Pathology)

Pine wilt has been killing our pines for decades. It is caused by a nematode (microscopic worm) that is spread by a beetle. The nematodes and beetles spend the winter in dead and dying trees. The beetles, loaded up with nematodes, start emerging in late April or early May and spread to new trees. Got pine wilt? Get that tree outta there! Chop it down, and burn or chip the wood, making sure not to leave stumps. Get this done in early April to stop disease spread.

If you have a dead pine in the eastern 2/3 of Kansas it could very well be pine wilt. Sure, it could be something else, like drought, but if it’s dead anyway you might as well assume it is pine wilt, and get it out and destroyed. You can send a sample in to KSU for testing if you want to know.

And, if you suspect pine wilt in the western part of the state, contact your local county K-State Research and Extension agent for help. Not only do we want it destroyed, we want to know where it is so we can understand where disease is spreading. (Find your agent here: https://www.ksre.k-state.edu/about/stateandareamaps.html)

 

Entirely dead tree? Cut it down and destroy the wood by chipping or burning.

 

 

 

Pines have multiple problems though, such as tip blight and Dothistroma needle blight. If you have any doubt you can work with your KSRE Extension agent to ship a sample up to KSU. For more information on pine diseases, and how to tell them apart, check out our publication about Pine Diseases in Kansas

Weed Control Update

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

As I look back through blog posts from Spring time in previous years, I notice a repeated theme – Crabgrass, Knotweed and Wild Garlic.

So instead of “reinventing the wheel this year” and writing a new blog post I am going to post previous years posts for these weeds.  There is lots of great information about these weeds and how to control them. (Links to information below the photograph.)

This way I can focus on adding a weed to this list that is become more and more persistent in Kansas. (Stay tuned!)

Crabgrass

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/more-than-you-ever-want-to-know-about-preemergent-herbicides/

Photo credit – Auburn University Turfgrass – http://cses.auburn.edu/turfgrass-management/weed-identification/wild-garlic/

Wild Garlic

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/stinks-dont-it-wild-garlic-control-in-turfgrass/

Knotweed

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/not-your-fathers-knotweed/ 

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Weekend Warrior Turfgrass Lawn Care

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Finally I think we have turned the corner into Spring.  With that, I see more and more of my neighbors, and myself, working in the yard.  I get excited when the turf starts to turn green.  But before I get too carried away I want to get out on the right foot and planning is everything.  To help help you plan out your lawncare program below are monthly calendars for tall fescue, Kentucky bluegrass, buffalograss, bermudagrass and zoysiagrass.

Bermudagrass and Zoysiagrass Lawns

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/a-homeowner-step-by-step-guide-to-bermudagrass-and-zoysiagrass-lawns/

Buffalograss Lawns

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/a-homeowner-step-by-step-buffalograss-lawn-guide/

Tall Fescue and Kentucky Bluegrass Lawns

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/a-homeowner-step-by-step-tall-fescue-and-kentucky-bluegrass-lawn-guide/

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

K-State Radio Network “Plantorama” – Home Lawn Winterkill

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

HOME LAWN WINTERKILL– It was a fairly harsh winter in this region.  And that has homeowners wondering if their lawn grasses were adversely affected by the extended cold and wet conditions. K-State turfgrass specialist Jared Hoyle says while the likelihood of outright turfgrass winterkill is relatively low, some limited damage may have occurred.

Click the link below for K-State Research and Extension Agriculture Today Radio Program “Plantorama” hosted by Eric Atkinson.

Check out the KSRE bookstore more more information on all things turf! – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Category.aspx?id=528&catId=545

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Control of Turfgrass Diseases

“Turfgrasses under intensive management are often subject to outbreaks of infectious diseases. Diseases usually are most damaging when weather or cultural conditions favor the disease-causing agent but not plant growth and vigor.”

http://www2.ca.uky.edu/agcomm/pubs/PPA/PPA1/PPA1.pdf

This quote from the “Chemical Control  of Turfgrass Diseases 2017” publication at University of Kentucky and Rutgers University, really sums up why we have diseases in our turfgrass systems.  Many times we have no control over weather or the cultural conditions that favor disease-casuing agents and those same conditions do not favor turfgrass growth.  To prepare for 2019 download this publication from Drs. Vincelli, Clark and Munshaw and keep it around as a great reference.  I keep a copy of this publication along with my weed control manual (https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/new-turfgrass-weed-control-for-professionals-2019/) at all times.

  • Jared Hoyle

NEW – Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals – 2019

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

With new herbicides entering the market, new techniques for controlling weeds, and with more and more difficult to control weeds the “Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals” manual has been updated to address many of these issues.  Check out the 2019 edition!  It is a must have for every turfgrass manager!

To get your copy click here – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=20239

 

First 2019 Disease Report from Mizzou

Only of our good friends to the east, Dr. Lee Miller, posted his first disease report of 2019.  In this update he covers what we have been through over the past winter and what to look for in the weather to come.  Check it out!  This is some great information, especially if you are on the east side of Kansas.

https://turfpath.missouri.edu/reports/2019/update03_21_19.cfm?fbclid=IwAR2-mfRuh5r_-pnd8LbpHYEPEsZn4z2-pOwpE77hr6ozxUS4aVW1MHblfso

(Figured I would add a picture in here that shows some green turf! – Jared Hoyle)

K-State Olathe Open House – April 6th, 2019

K-State Horticulture Major on Display at K-State Olathe Open House

The K-State undergraduate horticulture major and specialization areas, including golf course and sports turf operations, horticulture production, horticulture science, and landscape horticulture will be on display at the K-State Open House at the Olathe Campus on Saturday, April 6 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the building’s 2nd floor.  If you have employees, family, or friends in the Kansas City area who may be interested in studying horticulture at K-State, please have them stop by!

K-State Olathe is located at 22201 W. Innovation Drive, Olathe, KS To learn more about the K-State Olathe Campus Open House activities, visit website.