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K-State Turfgrass

Author: jahoyle

Cool-season Turfgrass Lawn Care Reminders!

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

It is that time of year again to start working on your cool-season lawn.  To try and cover it all, I have listed a couple posts from the past that can help you get that lawn into shape.  I also have added a list of publications. Enjoy!

Time to fertilize cool-season turfgrass

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/time-to-fertilize-cool-season-turfgrass/ 

Monthly calendar for cool-season lawns for the rest of the year

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/monthly-calendar-for-cool-season-lawns-for-the-rest-of-2017/

Power raking or core aeration – That is the question!

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/power-raking-or-core-aeration-that-is-the-question/

The art of knowing your seed label

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/the-art-of-knowing-your-seed-label/

For seeding success, pay attention to other crop on the seed label

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/for-seeding-success-pay-attention-to-other-crop-on-the-seed-label/

Publications

Lawn Fertilizing Guide – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=10639

Recycling your grass clippings  – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=701

Mowing your lawn – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=615

Tall Fescue Lawns – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=1460

Watering New Lawns – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=1337

Planting a Home Lawn – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=595

Aerating Your Lawn – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=713

Kentucky Bluegrass Lawns – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=713

 

Check out the KSRE Bookstore for more publications – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Category.aspx?id=528&catId=545

 

Yellow Woodsorrel (Oxalis stricta) Control

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Yellow woodsorrel (Oxalis stricta) is a perennial or annual broadleaf weed that has clover-like trifoliate heart shaped leaves.  Yellow woodsorrel most commonly spreads by seeds that are contained in a capsule that when it explodes ejects the seeds.  It can be confused with clover but has yellow flowers with five petals.  You can find this weed in a wide range of soil conditions and can commonly be confused with black medic, birdsfoot trefoil and white clover. A similar species is creeping woodsorrel but it is most commonly found in landscape plantings while yellow woodsorrel is most commonly found in turf.

To control oxalis, herbicides that contain triclopyr and fluroxypyr are very effective.

 

 

 

 

Herbicides that contain fluroxypyr include;

  • Battleship III
  • Escalade 2
  • Momentum FX2
  • Tailspin
  • Vista XRT

Herbicides that contain triclopyr include;

  • 2-D
  • 4-Speed XT
  • Battleship III
  • Chaser
  • Chaser 2 amine
  • Confront
  • Cool Power
  • Eliminate
  • Horsepower
  • Momentum  FX2
  • Tailspin
  • Three-Way Ester II
  • Turflon Ester Ultra
  • Turflon II amine
  • Triclopyr 4
  • TZONE

Always remember a healthy turfgrass stand through proper maintenance is the best weed control and can help minimize oxalis in your turfgrass.

Information from this post if from “Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals” To get your copy today click here – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=20239

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Support the KSU Turfgrass Students and Have Fun!

Come out on September 30th to Colbert Hills Golf Course and play in the Kansas State University Golf Course Superintendent Student Chapter Fundraiser Golf Tournament!

This is a great way to show your support to the future of the turf industry and the students all while having some fun on the golf course.

If you can’t make it show your support by sponsoring a hole.

See information about signing up below!.

Future of Turf 2018 on Sept. 6, 2018 – Hosted by Corteva Agriscience (Dow AgroSciences)

Corteva will be hosting the Future of Turf 2018 on Sept. 6, 2018, from 1 to 3 p.m., at Kansas State University’s Rocky Ford Turf Research Center. At the FREE educational field day, you will get a preview of our groundbreaking new products, GameOn™ and Relzar™ specialty herbicides, which will use a new chemistry to control tough weeds like never before.

This technical event, located at 1700 Barnes Road, Manhattan, KS 66502, will include hands-on demonstrations and cover technical topics like understanding mixing and handling, recognizing turf injury, importance of flexible application timing and more.

Signup here – http://engage.corteva.com/FutureOfTurf

For more information, please contact Dow AgroSciences Territory Manager Colleen Derksen at 317-691-6982 or via email at cmderksen@dow.com.

 

White Clover Control

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

School is starting back and college football is right around the corner.  This tells me it is the best time of the year to start renovating, overseeding or establishing new cool-season turfgrass areas. But before you do that, you might have some unwanted weeds to get rid of.  White clover is one of the most common weeds found in cool-season turfgrass.  It can grow in a wide range of environmental conditions and can tolerate many of our cultural practices.   It can also spread by seeds and by stolons.

White clover is a perennial broadleaf weed that has trifoliate leaves that may or may not have a wedged-shaped mark. Although it is called white clover the flowers are white but may turn pink as they age.

Because white clover can fix its own nitrogen some see it as an important species to add beneficial soil nitrogen.  There had been some work done to explore using both clover and turfgrass in a mixture in their lawns.  Others may consider it as a weed.

If you consider it a weed, fall is a great time to try and control it.  But did you know 2,4-D, glyphosate and sulfentrazone do not control white clover?  For best control herbicides that contain clopyralid, dicamba, fluroxypyr, florasulam, metsulfruon, and/or quinclorac (also controls crabgrass) provide the best control when applied in the fall.

Always remember a healthy turfgrass stand through proper maintenance is the best weed control and can help minimize clover in you turfgrass.

Information from this post if from “Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals” To get your copy today click here – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=20239

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

2018 K-State Turfgrass Research Reports Online!

 

(by Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension )

Every year the Kansas Agriculture Experiment Station publishes research reports on projects that are being conducted around the state.  The 2018 Turfgrass Research Reports are now online!  These reports contain everything from turfgrass variety testing, weed control, disease and insect management and more.

Below are a list of the 2018 reports.  Click the title to read more.

Extent of Larval Populations of Turfgrass Insect Pests at Rocky Ford Turfgrass Research Center at Manhattan, KS
Raymond A. Cloyd

Herbicide and Application Timing Effects on Windmillgrass Control
Nicholas Mitchell and Jared Hoyle

Evaluating Small Unmanned Aerial Systems for Detecting Drought Stress on Turfgrass
Mu Hong, Dale Bremer, and Deon van der Merwe

Urban Lawn Microclimates Affect Reference Evapotranspiration
Kenton W. Peterson, Dale J. Bremer, and Jack D. Fry

Evaluating Zoysiagrass-Tall Fescue Mixtures in Kansas
Mingying Xiang, Jack D. Fry, and Megan M. Kennelly

Brown Patch Occurrence in a Zoysiagrass-Tall Fescue Polystand Compared to a Tall Fescue Monostand
Mingying Xiang, Jack D. Fry, and Megan M. Kennelly

Evaluating Large Patch-Tolerant and Cold Hardy Zoysiagrass Germplasm in the Transition Zone
Mingying Xiang, Jack D. Fry, and Megan M. Kennelly

2013 National Turfgrass Evaluation Program Bermudagrass Test: 2013–2017 Summary Report
Linda R. Parsons, Michael J. Shelton, Jason J. Griffin, and Jared A. Hoyle

2012 National Turfgrass Evaluation Program Tall Fescue Test: 2012–2017 Summary Report
Linda R. Parsons, Michael J. Shelton, Megan M. Kennelly, Jason J. Griffin, and Jared A. Hoyle

2013 National Turfgrass Evaluation Program Bermudagrass Test: 2017 Data
Linda R. Parsons, Michael J. Shelton, Jason J. Griffin, and Jared A. Hoyle

2012 National Turfgrass Evaluation Program Tall Fescue Test: 2017 Data
Linda R. Parsons, Michael J. Shelton, Megan M. Kennelly, Jason J. Griffin, and Jared A. Hoyle

 

Postemergent Crabgrass Control

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Did you apply a preemergent herbicide this year and still have crabgrass? There are many different reasons you may have break through from a preemergent herbicide application.  If the turf is stressed and thin, along with over use of the turf and misapplications are some reasons you may be seeing crabgrass pop-up across many turfgrass areas.

Good news! There are some postemergent herbicide options out there for crabgrass control.  But depending on how big or how many tillers the crabgrass has will help you determine what product to use.  First, determine the size or stage of crabgrass you have present.

Here is a picture to show the tillering stages of crabgrass.

The smaller the crabgrass the easier it is to kill it.  The tillered crabgrass may take more than one application and higher rates so make sure you check the label for correct application rates and intervals.

  • dithopyr – Can provide control to crabgrass up to one tiller stage.  This product also has preemergence activity.
  • quinclorac – Can be applied on most cool- and warm-season turfgrass species.  This product controls crabgrass when it is one tiller or smaller or when it has four or more tillers.
  • mesotrione – Can be effective for crabgrass control but in most cases will take two applications at two week intervals. The label also states that applications must be made before the four tiller crabgrass stage.
  • topramazone – Similar to mesotrione, this product will require two applications at three week intervals. Use at higher rates on crabgrass that have greater than one tiller.
  • fenoxaprop – Are very effective in controlling crabgrass.  Label states that this product can be applied to annual grasses up to the five tiller stage. Remember not to tank mix with products that contain 2,4-D, antagonism can occur.

As one last reminder, do not apply post emergent herbicides when temperatures are greater than 85 deg F.  This will increase the risk of turfgrass injury.

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Bentgrass Declining? It’s from Western Europe, You live in Kansas

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

The past couple weeks have been a struggle to grow bentgrass.  Some areas in Kansas are getting rain but others are not.  The rains have been localized and here at the Rocky Ford Turfgrass Research Center in Manhattan we keep missing the isolated showers.

I know some other golf course are in the same place as we are and it has been a struggle to keep bentgrass alive.  Well, I dug through the blog and found a post from Dr. Jack Fry about bentgrass management in the summer.  Dr. Fry leads of the article with..

“In the midst of a summer with 100+ F temperatures, it’s worthwhile to consider some of creeping bentgrass’s preferences and management strategies that might be helpful to reduce its stress, and yours.  See, the thing about creeping bentgrass on putting greens is….”

Click below to find out more about bentgrass management in the summer.

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/bentgrass-declining-its-from-western-europe-you-live-in-kansas-by-dr-fry/

Don’t miss the Kansas Turfgrass Field Day August 2nd in Manhattan!

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

The Kansas Turfgrass Field Day will be held Thursday, August 2 at the Rocky Ford Turf Research Center in Manhattan.

You can register online at https://2018turfday.eventbrite.com

The field day program is designed for all segments of the turf industry – lawn care, athletic fields, golf courses, and grounds maintenance. Included on the program are research presentations, problem diagnosis, commercial exhibitors, and equipment displays. There will be time to see current research, talk to the experts and get answers to your questions.

Pesticide recertification credits in 3A and 3B are available, as well as GCSAA education points.

Would you like to be a vendor at field day?

For more information check out The Kansas Turfgrass Foundation Website – http://www.kansasturfgrassfoundation.com/annual-ktf-field-day.html

A Hard Winter on Bermuda

By Dr. Jack Fry and Mingying Xiang, (KSU Turfgrass Teaching, Research and Extension)

It was a hard winter for bermudagrass, and we saw extensive winter injury in Kansas – even to cultivars that we usually consider winter hardy. There is a trial at the Rocky Ford Turfgrass Research Center in Manhattan in which we’re evaluating experimental bermudagrasses from the breeding program at Oklahoma State University lead by Dr. Yanqi Wu (Fig. 1). Here are averages (of three replicated plots) of winter injury for standard cultivars included in the trial when we rated them on May 25: Tifway (100%); Latitude 36 (80%); Northbridge (75%); and Patriot (70%). The total loss of Tifway isn’t unusual, as it has poor cold hardiness. However, the severity of this winter caused severe damage to cultivars we previously thought were relatively hardy, including Latitude 36 and Northbridge. There is some good news. Several experimental grasses included in this trial experienced almost no winter injury, which bodes well for release of grasses with good cold hardiness in the future.

Fig. 1. Dr. Yanqi Qu and Mingying Xiang evaluate Oklahoma State’s experimental bermudas growing in 5 by 5 ft plots at Rocky Ford on May 25. Notice that many have extensive winter injury, while others are showing good recovery.

We heard from turf professionals in the state who indicated that injury was severe in some cases, and minimal in others – microclimates and differences in exposure likely had a lot to do with that.   Yukon bermudagrass, a seeded cultivar, had almost no winter injury at Wildcat Creek Golf and Fitness in Manhattan (Fig 2). This was impressive considering it was seeded in 2017.

Fig. 2. Yukon Bermuda, seeded in the summer of 2017 by Kevin Fateley at Wildcat Creek Golf and Fitness in Manhattan, KS showed very good recovery in May and almost no winter injury.

Fortunately, it has been a great summer for recovery. High temperatures above 100 F and lows in the mid 70s speed the growth and spread of bermuda. Unfortunately, it’s been another one of those hard summers for cool-season grasses. Here we are in Kansas trying to cope with the wrath of extreme winter and summer temperatures – been here, done this.