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Emerald Ash Borer Workshop – Doniphan County, June 7

The Kansas Forest Service is sponsoring a workshop about EAB on June 7, 12:30-4:30 in Troy (Doniphan County). Topics include identification and biology, EAB quarantine rules, tree injection information, and more. Certified pesticide applicator and arborist credits are available.

Here is the link to the brochure:

http://www.kansasforests.org/events/news_docs/calendar/DPCO%20EAB%20Workshop%206-7-17.pdf

 

There is a shorter, more general session in the evening:

Tree Field Day, Overland Park Arboretum, June 2

The Kansas Forest Service is hosting a tree event at the Overland Park Arboretum on Friday, June 2. It’s the Walnut Council Field Day, and usually the focus is more on rural trees. But, with the unique Overland Park location, some of the topics are right in line with urban trees, including tree identification and tree problems

Here is the registration form and full schedule:

http://www.kansasforests.org/events/news_docs/calendar/WCFD2017.pdf

Plants are good for people

I think we all know that plants and nature are good for people. However, to read more about the social side of the green industry you can check out this interesting article about “Trees, jobs, health, and equity in the urban forest.”

As the article says, “Even the smallest bits of nature in the city can make a positive difference in people’s daily lives.”

Here is the link:

https://tcia.org/TCI-publications/tci-magazine/2017/05/index.html#?page=62

Ash/Lilac Borer: Don’t Get “Bored-Down” By This Caterpillar Borer

The time of year has come to be thinking about dealing with the ash/lilac borer (Podosesia syringae). First, you need to understand that this is not the same insect pest as the Emerald ash borer (Agrilius planipennis), which was recently discovered (March 31, 2017) in Doniphan County (Kansas now has 7 counties under quarantine). Emerald ash borer is a wood-boring beetle whereas the ash/lilac borer is a wood-boring caterpillar.

Read more on the Entomology Blog!

 

Turfgrass management by the numbers!

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

One of the most common question I am asked is…

“What do you think about this product?  Would you apply it?”

Well sometimes I have had experience with that product and sometimes I have not.  If not I go look for the research and look at the numbers and then respond to the question with the best information that I have. It is then up to the superintendent to apply that product or not.

You can look at the numbers as well.  You can run your own test trials and see the results with your own eyes.  In the article below titled “I used product X and my greens have never looked so good!” hits on some great points.

  • If it ain’t broke don’t fix it.
  • Ask for data to backup claims of that product.
  • Make test plots at your location. (If you have a check remember if you don’t do anything at all to that area it will not look as good as the surrounding turf.  You have to keep everything the same except what you are testing.)
  • Record numbers!
  • Did a product actually work or was it just a better year for growing turfgrass.  (Well in KS it is never easy growing turfgrass.)

Click here for the entire article – https://dcsturf.wordpress.com/2017/04/05/i-used-product-x-and-my-greens-have-never-looked-so-good/ 

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Wild garlic control in turfgrass

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Did you know there are benefits to eating garlic?  It is highly nutritious but has very few low calories, it can help combat sickness, it can reduce blood pressure, and more.

Around Manhattan I have been seeing a lot of wild garlic in lawns.  Now don’t go out and eat that wild garlic. We are now talking about the turfgrass weed wild garlic and not the garlic you consume.

Wild garlic is more obvious in the winter and early spring because this weed will grow above the turfgrass canopy and is easily noticed.  Wild garlic is a perennial bulb that has a grass like appliance.  It emerges in late winter and early spring.  The leaves are straight and smooth.  The way to tell the difference between wild garlic wild onion is by tearing the stem to see if it is hollow or solid.  It if is hollow then it is wild garlic.  If it is a solid stem then it could be wild onion.

This weed tolerate a wide range of soil conditions but I have noticed it more in low maintenance areas.

Photo credit – Auburn University Turfgrass – http://cses.auburn.edu/turfgrass-management/weed-identification/wild-garlic/

Control of wild garlic in cool-season turfgrass is more difficult then in warm-season turfgrasses.  For fair control use 2,4-D or one of the many combinations of 2,4-D, MCPP and dicamba.  This products have shown to have limited control.  The ester formulations of 2,4-D are more effective than amine formulations.  Applications in the late fall and early spring when there is adequate foliage is best.  To increase uptake, mowing before application may help.

In warm-season turfgrass metsulfuron or metsulfuron + sulfentrazone and sulfosulfuron provide very effective control.  Applying these products in late March (Right now!) on a warm day above 50 deg F (Right now!) when there is good soil moisture (Right now!) will increase efficacy.

If you got wild garlic, right now is the time to go out and get it.  Not to mention if you have any other broadleaf weeds you will get some control of those as well!

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Kansas State University earns 2016 Tree Campus USA Recognition

Who are the future leaders in the Kansas green industries? Our K-State grads! Why are they so amazing? These students have excellent opportunities to engage in hands-on, practical learning.

As one piece of that, K-State was recently named a Tree Campus USA for the third year in a row. Congratulations to Dr. Cathie Lavis for leading the efforts, and kudos to the whole team.

More details are available in this article from K-State Communications:

http://www.k-state.edu/today/announcement.php?id=33231

As another benefit, ALL K-State students, faculty, staff, and visitors get to enjoy our beautiful campus.