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K-State Turfgrass

Category: Weeds

Weed Control Update

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

As I look back through blog posts from Spring time in previous years, I notice a repeated theme – Crabgrass, Knotweed and Wild Garlic.

So instead of “reinventing the wheel this year” and writing a new blog post I am going to post previous years posts for these weeds.  There is lots of great information about these weeds and how to control them. (Links to information below the photograph.)

This way I can focus on adding a weed to this list that is become more and more persistent in Kansas. (Stay tuned!)

Crabgrass

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/more-than-you-ever-want-to-know-about-preemergent-herbicides/

Photo credit – Auburn University Turfgrass – http://cses.auburn.edu/turfgrass-management/weed-identification/wild-garlic/

Wild Garlic

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/stinks-dont-it-wild-garlic-control-in-turfgrass/

Knotweed

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/not-your-fathers-knotweed/ 

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Weekend Warrior Turfgrass Lawn Care

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Finally I think we have turned the corner into Spring.  With that, I see more and more of my neighbors, and myself, working in the yard.  I get excited when the turf starts to turn green.  But before I get too carried away I want to get out on the right foot and planning is everything.  To help help you plan out your lawncare program below are monthly calendars for tall fescue, Kentucky bluegrass, buffalograss, bermudagrass and zoysiagrass.

Bermudagrass and Zoysiagrass Lawns

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/a-homeowner-step-by-step-guide-to-bermudagrass-and-zoysiagrass-lawns/

Buffalograss Lawns

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/a-homeowner-step-by-step-buffalograss-lawn-guide/

Tall Fescue and Kentucky Bluegrass Lawns

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/a-homeowner-step-by-step-tall-fescue-and-kentucky-bluegrass-lawn-guide/

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

NEW – Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals – 2019

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

With new herbicides entering the market, new techniques for controlling weeds, and with more and more difficult to control weeds the “Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals” manual has been updated to address many of these issues.  Check out the 2019 edition!  It is a must have for every turfgrass manager!

To get your copy click here – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=20239

 

Cool-season Turfgrass Lawn Care Reminders!

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

It is that time of year again to start working on your cool-season lawn.  To try and cover it all, I have listed a couple posts from the past that can help you get that lawn into shape.  I also have added a list of publications. Enjoy!

Time to fertilize cool-season turfgrass

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/time-to-fertilize-cool-season-turfgrass/ 

Monthly calendar for cool-season lawns for the rest of the year

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/monthly-calendar-for-cool-season-lawns-for-the-rest-of-2017/

Power raking or core aeration – That is the question!

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/power-raking-or-core-aeration-that-is-the-question/

The art of knowing your seed label

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/the-art-of-knowing-your-seed-label/

For seeding success, pay attention to other crop on the seed label

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/for-seeding-success-pay-attention-to-other-crop-on-the-seed-label/

Publications

Lawn Fertilizing Guide – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=10639

Recycling your grass clippings  – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=701

Mowing your lawn – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=615

Tall Fescue Lawns – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=1460

Watering New Lawns – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=1337

Planting a Home Lawn – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=595

Aerating Your Lawn – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=713

Kentucky Bluegrass Lawns – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=713

 

Check out the KSRE Bookstore for more publications – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Category.aspx?id=528&catId=545

 

Yellow Woodsorrel (Oxalis stricta) Control

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Yellow woodsorrel (Oxalis stricta) is a perennial or annual broadleaf weed that has clover-like trifoliate heart shaped leaves.  Yellow woodsorrel most commonly spreads by seeds that are contained in a capsule that when it explodes ejects the seeds.  It can be confused with clover but has yellow flowers with five petals.  You can find this weed in a wide range of soil conditions and can commonly be confused with black medic, birdsfoot trefoil and white clover. A similar species is creeping woodsorrel but it is most commonly found in landscape plantings while yellow woodsorrel is most commonly found in turf.

To control oxalis, herbicides that contain triclopyr and fluroxypyr are very effective.

 

 

 

 

Herbicides that contain fluroxypyr include;

  • Battleship III
  • Escalade 2
  • Momentum FX2
  • Tailspin
  • Vista XRT

Herbicides that contain triclopyr include;

  • 2-D
  • 4-Speed XT
  • Battleship III
  • Chaser
  • Chaser 2 amine
  • Confront
  • Cool Power
  • Eliminate
  • Horsepower
  • Momentum  FX2
  • Tailspin
  • Three-Way Ester II
  • Turflon Ester Ultra
  • Turflon II amine
  • Triclopyr 4
  • TZONE

Always remember a healthy turfgrass stand through proper maintenance is the best weed control and can help minimize oxalis in your turfgrass.

Information from this post if from “Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals” To get your copy today click here – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=20239

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

White Clover Control

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

School is starting back and college football is right around the corner.  This tells me it is the best time of the year to start renovating, overseeding or establishing new cool-season turfgrass areas. But before you do that, you might have some unwanted weeds to get rid of.  White clover is one of the most common weeds found in cool-season turfgrass.  It can grow in a wide range of environmental conditions and can tolerate many of our cultural practices.   It can also spread by seeds and by stolons.

White clover is a perennial broadleaf weed that has trifoliate leaves that may or may not have a wedged-shaped mark. Although it is called white clover the flowers are white but may turn pink as they age.

Because white clover can fix its own nitrogen some see it as an important species to add beneficial soil nitrogen.  There had been some work done to explore using both clover and turfgrass in a mixture in their lawns.  Others may consider it as a weed.

If you consider it a weed, fall is a great time to try and control it.  But did you know 2,4-D, glyphosate and sulfentrazone do not control white clover?  For best control herbicides that contain clopyralid, dicamba, fluroxypyr, florasulam, metsulfruon, and/or quinclorac (also controls crabgrass) provide the best control when applied in the fall.

Always remember a healthy turfgrass stand through proper maintenance is the best weed control and can help minimize clover in you turfgrass.

Information from this post if from “Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals” To get your copy today click here – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=20239

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

2018 K-State Turfgrass Research Reports Online!

 

(by Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension )

Every year the Kansas Agriculture Experiment Station publishes research reports on projects that are being conducted around the state.  The 2018 Turfgrass Research Reports are now online!  These reports contain everything from turfgrass variety testing, weed control, disease and insect management and more.

Below are a list of the 2018 reports.  Click the title to read more.

Extent of Larval Populations of Turfgrass Insect Pests at Rocky Ford Turfgrass Research Center at Manhattan, KS
Raymond A. Cloyd

Herbicide and Application Timing Effects on Windmillgrass Control
Nicholas Mitchell and Jared Hoyle

Evaluating Small Unmanned Aerial Systems for Detecting Drought Stress on Turfgrass
Mu Hong, Dale Bremer, and Deon van der Merwe

Urban Lawn Microclimates Affect Reference Evapotranspiration
Kenton W. Peterson, Dale J. Bremer, and Jack D. Fry

Evaluating Zoysiagrass-Tall Fescue Mixtures in Kansas
Mingying Xiang, Jack D. Fry, and Megan M. Kennelly

Brown Patch Occurrence in a Zoysiagrass-Tall Fescue Polystand Compared to a Tall Fescue Monostand
Mingying Xiang, Jack D. Fry, and Megan M. Kennelly

Evaluating Large Patch-Tolerant and Cold Hardy Zoysiagrass Germplasm in the Transition Zone
Mingying Xiang, Jack D. Fry, and Megan M. Kennelly

2013 National Turfgrass Evaluation Program Bermudagrass Test: 2013–2017 Summary Report
Linda R. Parsons, Michael J. Shelton, Jason J. Griffin, and Jared A. Hoyle

2012 National Turfgrass Evaluation Program Tall Fescue Test: 2012–2017 Summary Report
Linda R. Parsons, Michael J. Shelton, Megan M. Kennelly, Jason J. Griffin, and Jared A. Hoyle

2013 National Turfgrass Evaluation Program Bermudagrass Test: 2017 Data
Linda R. Parsons, Michael J. Shelton, Jason J. Griffin, and Jared A. Hoyle

2012 National Turfgrass Evaluation Program Tall Fescue Test: 2017 Data
Linda R. Parsons, Michael J. Shelton, Megan M. Kennelly, Jason J. Griffin, and Jared A. Hoyle

 

Postemergent Crabgrass Control

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Did you apply a preemergent herbicide this year and still have crabgrass? There are many different reasons you may have break through from a preemergent herbicide application.  If the turf is stressed and thin, along with over use of the turf and misapplications are some reasons you may be seeing crabgrass pop-up across many turfgrass areas.

Good news! There are some postemergent herbicide options out there for crabgrass control.  But depending on how big or how many tillers the crabgrass has will help you determine what product to use.  First, determine the size or stage of crabgrass you have present.

Here is a picture to show the tillering stages of crabgrass.

The smaller the crabgrass the easier it is to kill it.  The tillered crabgrass may take more than one application and higher rates so make sure you check the label for correct application rates and intervals.

  • dithopyr – Can provide control to crabgrass up to one tiller stage.  This product also has preemergence activity.
  • quinclorac – Can be applied on most cool- and warm-season turfgrass species.  This product controls crabgrass when it is one tiller or smaller or when it has four or more tillers.
  • mesotrione – Can be effective for crabgrass control but in most cases will take two applications at two week intervals. The label also states that applications must be made before the four tiller crabgrass stage.
  • topramazone – Similar to mesotrione, this product will require two applications at three week intervals. Use at higher rates on crabgrass that have greater than one tiller.
  • fenoxaprop – Are very effective in controlling crabgrass.  Label states that this product can be applied to annual grasses up to the five tiller stage. Remember not to tank mix with products that contain 2,4-D, antagonism can occur.

As one last reminder, do not apply post emergent herbicides when temperatures are greater than 85 deg F.  This will increase the risk of turfgrass injury.

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Yellow Nutsedge Control

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

As I talk to turfgrass professionals across the state I hear that some are getting plenty of rain while others are getting none. This time of the year we think that if we are getting some precipitation we will have yellow nutsedge popping up everywhere. Well that is not always true. Yellow nutsedge does favor moist soils but it can also grow in well-drained sites.

One of the easiest ways to identify yellow nutsedge is by a couple special features;

  • erect
  • persistant
  • yellow inflorescence
  • gradually tapering leaves to a sharp point
  • tubers not in chains
  • triangular stem

To control yellow nutsedge, if you can get applications out before tuber production then you will see increased control.  But beware, yellow nutsedge will continue to grow as long as the environment is favorable for growth, so more than one application maybe necessary.

If using a herbicide application timing is critical.  During mid summer yellow nutsedge starts making tubers and if you apply herbicides before tuber production you will get better control.  If you wait until the yellow nutsedge is big and starting to make tubers then you will be playing catch-up all year. So sooner is better.  Don’t wait for it to get too big.

Here are some options for yellow nutsedge control for turfgrass professionals;

  • sulfentrazone
  • halosulfuron
  • iodosulfuron
  • mesotrione
  • bentazon
  • triflozysulfuron
  • flazasulfuron
  • sulfosulfuron

There are many different products out there that contain these active ingredients so just make sure you have an active ingredient that has yellow nutsedge control! Also make sure you check for turfgrass tolerances.

****Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application.****

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Return of the Goathead – Puncturevine

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Return of the Goathead – Sounds like a horror movie! Well, right now I do feel like it is “Return of the Goathead”. Just about everywhere I look I see a goathead. Goathead is also known as puncturevine (Tribulus terrestris). It is a summer annual broadleaf weed that can cause headaches for many people.

 

This weed is a prostrate mat-forming weed that can produce many burs with sharp spines. This weed if invading a lawn, athletic field, playground and parks can cause injury to children and animals if they fall on or step on the sharp spines. It can also be found in disturbed areas as fields, pastures and roadsides. Good news is that many of the broadleaf herbicides are effective.

 

****Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application.****

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf