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Scanners in Media Development Center available for many types of work

Of all the devices in the Media Development Center (213 Hale Library), the scanners are most frequently used by students and faculty/staff. There are three types:


Large flatbed scanner in the Media Development Center
Large flatbed scanner in the Media Development Center


The flatbed scanners are the most commonly used. They are the most versatile, as they have the ability to scan pictures, drawings, documents, and books that measure up to 12 inches by 17 inches. Professors use them to scan book pages to post online or to show via document cameras. Architecture students use them to scan layouts and floor plans for digital storage. Other uses are to edit a scanned document and archive pictures.

Large sheet-fed scanner with duplexing in the MDC
Large sheet-fed scanner with duplexing in the MDC
There are several multi-page sheet-fed scanners. The smaller scanner is better suited to documents such as papers for classes, job applications, etc. The larger scanner has duplexing capability and allows the user to scan both sides of the page simultaneously. These scanners are helpful if you have a text document that you need to edit. The scanners have the ability to read the document and convert it to an editable text document in Microsoft Word or whatever text program you are comfortable with.

Slide-and-film scanner in the MDC
Slide-and-film scanner in the MDC
Slide and film scanners are yet another type of scanner in the MDC. These scanners are for individuals who want to either use film to capture their photography and digitally edit the pictures, or just archive film negatives or slides to preserve. These scanners have the ability to scan either positive or negative 35-millimeter film, 35-millimeter slides, or 120-millimeter film.

If you have a document that needs to be converted to digital format, the MDC has the tool. For more about the MDC’s resources and hours, see the Media Development Center website.

This article was written by Chad Palmer, student employee in the Media Development Center.