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Author: Cathy Rodriguez

Cybersecurity Awareness Training final reminder for 2019

K-State faculty and staff who haven’t completed the state-mandated annual Cybersecurity Awareness Training for 2019 will receive a reminder on Thursday, January 23.

This training introduces basic computer security concepts and good security practices and takes approximately 30 minutes to complete.

Cybersecurity awareness training is an important part of K-State’s strategy to protect our information systems and data. “We ALL have a responsibility to protect the information assets entrusted to us. Everyone at K-State serves a critical role in protecting K-State data”, said Chad Currier, K-State’s chief information security officer.

Everyone at K-State serves a critical role in protecting K-State data

Once you complete the training, your personnel record in HRIS will be updated. It will be listed under the Training Summary as Cybersecurity Awareness, with the course code WIT590.

If you have questions about the security awareness training, contact the IT Help Desk at helpdesk@k-state.edu or 532-7722.

Register for the 2020 Top Hat Info Session today!

What is Top Hat?

Top Hat is a classroom engagement system that has been integrated with K-State’s Canvas. Many instructors are using the platform in their classrooms this spring through the use of quick questions and discussions to increase student participation and engagement and receive real-time feedback. The questions and attendance scores can automatically be tracked and synced into Canvas.

K-State has signed an agreement with Top Hat to provide a lower fee structure for students, who can purchase a $24 semester subscription with access to all courses using Top Hat within the semester.

Who is the Top Hat Info Session for?

This session is for:

  • Instructors who have not yet seen or heard about the platform
  • Instructors who did not have time in the past to take a look at the platform
  • Instructors who are not sure yet of how they can use active learning platform in class
  • Instructors who want to hear from K-State faculty’s experience using the platform

When is the Top Hat Info Session taking place? 

Amanda Laila, the K-State Top Hat Consultant will run the information session on Wednesday, January 15, 1:30-3:30 p.m. in the Big 12 room, K-State Student Union.

Submit your registration.

Participants will learn how to create an active learning environment in the classroom by implementing core Top Hat functionalities in order to boost student engagement, participation and motivation.

Logistics: 
Eligibility: All faculty members (tenured, tenure-track, or term) and staff with a teaching role who have a genuine interest in learning about and building on their current Top Hat knowledge are encouraged to attend. This event is limited to 25 individuals, who will be selected on the first come-first served basis.
Questions?
Would you like a one-on-one Top Hat training?
K-State’s dedicated Top Hat representative is Amanda Laila. Contact Amanda via email at amanda.laila@tophatmonocle.com or book an appointment via her calendar webpage.

Reminder: VPN users need to switch to GlobalProtect by Nov. 14

GlobalProtect logoOn November 14, the AnyConnect VPN will be retired. K-Staters who use AnyConnect as their VPN client need to switch to GlobalProtect.

GlobalProtect is currently available for both Mac and Windows platforms. GlobalProtect will be available later this year for Linux computers, smartphones, and tablets.

Installation instructions

For more information about the VPN visit: https://www.k-state.edu/its/security/secure-data/vpn/

Cybersecurity: Creating a password

Creating a strong password is an essential step to protecting yourself online. Using long and complex passwords is one of the easiest ways to defend yourself from cybercrime. No citizen is immune to cyber risk, but #BeCyberSmart and you can minimize your chances of an incident.

SIMPLE TIPS TO SECURE IT.

Creating a strong password is easier than you think. Follow these simple tips to shake up your password protocol:

  • Use a long passphrase. According to NIST guidance, you should consider using the longest password or passphrase permissible. For example, you can use a passphrase such as a news headline or even the title of the last book you read. Then add in some punctuation and capitalization.
  • Don’t make passwords easy to guess. Do not include personal information in your password such as your name or pets’ names. This information is often easy to find on social media, making it easier for cybercriminals to hack your accounts.
  • Avoid using common words in your password. Substitute letters with numbers and punctuation marks or symbols. For example, @ can replace the letter “A” and an exclamation point (!) can replace the letters “I” or “L.”
  • Get creative. Use phonetic replacements, such as “PH” instead of “F”. Or make deliberate, but obvious misspellings, such as “enjin” instead of “engine.”
  • Keep your passwords on the down-low. Don’t tell anyone your passwords and watch for attackers trying to trick you into revealing your passwords through email or calls. Every time you share or reuse a password, it chips away at your security by opening up more avenues in which it could be misused or stolen.
  • Unique account, unique password. Having different passwords for various accounts helps prevent cyber criminals from gaining access to these accounts and protect you in the event of a breach. It’s important to mix things up—find easy-to- remember ways to customize your standard password for different sites.
  • Double your login protection. Enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) to ensure that the only person who has access to your account is you. Use it for email, banking, social media, and any other service that requires logging in. If MFA is an option, enable it by using a trusted mobile device, such as your smartphone, an authenticator app, or a secure token—a small physical device that can hook onto your key ring.
  • Utilize a password manager to remember all your long passwords. The most secure way to store all of your unique passwords is by using a password manager. With just one master password, a computer can generate and retrieve passwords for every account that you have – protecting your online information, including credit card numbers and their three-digit Card Verification Value (CVV) codes, answers to security questions, and more.

Download the creating a password guide.

Microsoft Teams Essentials training

Microsoft Teams is a communication and collaboration tool that allows users and organizations to efficiently discuss and work on projects and tasks without the need of email, phones, or file sharing applications. This hands-on training will cover:

  • Accessing the application
  • Exploring the layout of the user interface
  • Understanding the purpose for the different levels of communication
  • Working on files at the same time as others
  • Getting an introduction to some of the additional apps
  • Demonstrating the integration to other Microsoft Office applications (such as Word and Excel)
  • Getting a brief walk-through of Shifts (scheduling)

More advanced features like Team creation and management will not be covered in this course.

Each training session will be limited to 30 users. Sessions will be held in Calvin 306 computer lab. Sessions are scheduled for the following dates:

  • Session 1: November 4, 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.
  • Session 2: November 7, 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
  • Session 3: November 7, 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.

There will also be onsite training classes at the Polytechnic Campus on November 5 in STC-124. These training sessions will be limited to 20 users.  Sessions are scheduled for the following date and times:

  • Session 1S: November 5, 9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
  • Session 2S: November 5, 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Register for the training.

 

 

Cybersecurity: Phishing

Phishing attacks use email or malicious websites to infect your machine with malware and viruses in order to collect personal and financial information. Cybercriminals attempt to lure users to click on a link or open an attachment that infects their computers, creating vulnerability to attacks. Phishing emails may appear to come from a real financial institution, e-commerce site, government agency, or any other service, business, or individual. The email may also request personal information such as account numbers, passwords, or Social Security numbers. When users respond with the information or click on a link, attackers use it to access users’ accounts.

HOW CRIMINALS LURE YOU IN

The following messages from the Federal Trade Commission’s OnGuardOnline are examples of what attackers may email or text when phishing for sensitive information:

  • “We suspect an unauthorized transaction on your account. To ensure that your account is not compromised, please click the link below, and confirm your identity.”
  • “During our regular verification of accounts, we couldn’t verify your information. Please click here to update and verify your information.”
  • “Our records indicate that your account was overcharged. You must call us within 7 days to receive your refund.”
  • To see examples of actual phishing emails, and steps to take if you believe you received a phishing email, please visit “

Continue reading “Cybersecurity: Phishing”

Cybersecurity: 5 steps to protecting your digital home

More and more of our home devices— including thermostats, door locks, coffee machines, and smoke alarms—are now connected to the Internet. This enables us to control our devices on our smartphones, no matter our location, which in turn can save us time and money while providing convenience and even safety. These advances in technology are innovative and intriguing, however they also pose a new set of security risks. #BeCyberSmart to connect with confidence and protect your digital home.

Continue reading “Cybersecurity: 5 steps to protecting your digital home”

Cybersecurity: Identity theft and internet scams

Today’s technology allows us to connect around the world, to bank and shop online, and to control our televisions, homes, and cars from our smartphones. With this added convenience comes an increased risk of identity theft and Internet scams. #BeCyberSmart on the Internet—at home, at school, at work, on mobile devices, and on the go.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • The total number of data breaches reported in 2018 decreased 23% from the total number of breaches reported in 2017, but the reported number of consumer records containing sensitive personally identifiable information (PII) exposed increased 126%.
  • Credit card fraud tops the list of identity theft reports in 2018. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) received more than 167,000 reports from people who said their information was misused on an existing account or to open a new credit card account.
  • Consumers reported $905 million in total fraud losses in 2017, a 21.6% increase over 2016.

Continue reading “Cybersecurity: Identity theft and internet scams”

Cybersecurity: While traveling

In a world where we are constantly connected, cybersecurity cannot be limited to the home or office. When you’re traveling— whether domestic or international—it is always important to practice safe online behavior and take proactive steps to secure Internet-enabled devices. The more we travel, the more we are at risk for cyberattacks. #BeCyberSmart and use these tips to connect with confidence while on the go.

SIMPLE TIPS TO OWN IT.

Before You Go

  • If you connect, you must protect. Whether it’s your computer, smartphone, game device, or other network devices, the best defense against viruses and malware is to update to the latest security software, web browser, and operating systems. Sign up for automatic updates, if you can, and protect your devices with anti-virus software.
  • Back up your information. Back up your contacts, financial data, photos, videos, and other mobile device data to another device or cloud service in case your device is compromised and you have to reset it to factory settings.
  • Be up-to-date. Keep your software updated to the latest version available. Maintain your security settings to keeping your information safe by turning on automatic updates so you don’t have to think about it, and set your security software to run regular scans.
  • Keep it locked. Lock your device when you are not using it. Even if you only step away for a few minutes, that is enough time for someone to steal or misuse your information. Set your devices to lock after a short time and use strong PINs and passwords.
  • Double your login protection. Enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) to ensure that the only person who has access to your account is you. Use it for email, banking, social media, and any other service that requires logging in. If MFA is an option, enable it by using a trusted mobile device, such as your smartphone, an authenticator app, or a secure token—a small physical device that can hook onto your key ring.

Continue reading “Cybersecurity: While traveling”