Kansas State University

search

IT News

Category: Accessibility

“Exploring Advanced Features of Qualtrics” March 18

“Exploring Advanced Features of Qualtrics” is scheduled 1:30–3:30 p.m. Friday, March 18, in 301A Hale Library. All students, faculty, and staff who use this research suite are welcome to attend.

KStateSurveysLandingPage

Continue reading ““Exploring Advanced Features of Qualtrics” March 18″

Closed-captioning available in K-State Online

ccby Information Technology Services

During the Spring 2016 Campus Open Forum with President Kirk Schulz on February 11, a question was asked about who faculty should contact for assistance meeting accessibility requirements. Ensuring accessibility of course lectures to all students is a high priority. Continue reading “Closed-captioning available in K-State Online”

Do you want to make your digital content accessible to all?

Attend the virtual accessible media, web, and technology conference that is being live-streamed starting today. This conference will give you a basic understanding of accessibility and offer specific strategies and information to help you do your part to implement accessible technology throughout the university.

Accessible media, web, and technology conference

Checkout the conference agenda. Only sessions from Track A will be streamed. Attend as many sessions as you like (come and go); no registration required. Note the conference agenda is in Mountain Time, which is one hour behind Central Time (8 a.m. session MT = 9 a.m. CT).  The sessions below are listed in Central Time.

Today’s room locations are:

  • 9 a.m.-4 p.m. sessions are in 401B Hale Library
  • 4-5:30 p.m. sessions are in 301A Hale Library

The Nov. 19-20 sessions will be in 301A Hale Library.

Virtual accessible media, web, technology conference begins Wednesday

Attend the virtual accessible media, web, technology conference that will be live-streamed Wednesday through Friday in Hale Library. You can learn how to do your part in making digital content accessible to all.

Checkout the conference agenda. Only sessions from Track A will be streamed. Attend as many sessions as you like; no registration required.

Continue reading “Virtual accessible media, web, technology conference begins Wednesday”

Accessible media, web, technology conference to be videostreamed Nov.18-20

Curb-cuts and elevators are behind us. Digital accessibility is upon us. This is evident in the ever increasing number of complaints and lawsuits against higher education institutions regarding this topic.  This timely virtual conference (come and go) will give you a basic understanding of accessibility and offer specific strategies and information to help you do your part to implement accessible technology throughout the university.

K-Staters are welcome to attend the free, live-streamed sessions of the Accessing Higher Ground – Accessible Media, Web and Technology Conference, Nov. 18-20See the virtual agenda for information about each session. Only sessions from Track A will be streamed.  Attend as many sessions as you like; no registration required.  Continue reading “Accessible media, web, technology conference to be videostreamed Nov.18-20”

Researchers, please read: Office of Science and Technology Policy presidential directive

By Mary Lou Marino

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy issued an email and memorandum last week in response to the more than 65,000 individuals and organizations that responded to or signed a petition to require free access over the Internet to scientific journal articles arising from taxpayer-funded research. The new directive applies to federal agencies that spend more than $100 million per year on research and development and requires each agency to create a plan for the free, public access to federally funded research within 12 months of publication.

The directive specifically addresses public access to peer-reviewed articles and scientific data. K-State researchers who receive funding from USDA, Department of Defense, Department of Energy, Homeland Security, Food and Drug Administration, NASA, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, Environmental Protection Agency and 14 other agencies are affected by this directive. Agencies have six months to submit draft plans; implementation will take place once final plans are in place.  Continue reading “Researchers, please read: Office of Science and Technology Policy presidential directive”

Adaptive-technology resources available on campus

Adaptive Technology resources are available in various venues throughout the campus computing environment.  Windows computers in the university computing labs and K-State InfoCommons have this accessibility software:

  • Magnifier — Screen-display utility for people who are visually impaired
  • On-Screen Keyboard — Virtual keyboard for people who are mobility-impaired
  • ZoomText — Screen magnifier for people who are visually impaired

Continue reading “Adaptive-technology resources available on campus”

Amara, a free and easy way to caption video

Amara is a free and easy-to-use video captioning and translation service. Captioning video makes videos accessible for the hearing-impaired and improves the video’s search results.  In addition to captioning video, you can also translate it into other languages.

Oftentimes, captioning and/or translating video is very time-consuming. Amara has made the task virtually pain-free.   Continue reading “Amara, a free and easy way to caption video”

Dragon speech-to-text software now available for K-Staters with disabilities

logo of the Dragon speech-recognition softwareiTAC is now offering Dragon NaturallySpeaking, a speech-to-text software, on one computer for use by K-State students and employees with disabilities.

According to the Dragon software page, this speech-recognition tool “allows busy professionals to dictate documents, send email, search the Web, and command and control their PCs — entirely by voice — for new levels of personal productivity and corporate cost savings.”

The Dragon software is on a computer adjacent to the IT Help Desk, 214 Hale Library. Users can check out the headset and microphone for the program from the iTAC receptionist 8 a.m.-5 p.m. in Hale 214 (or after hours, from the IT Help Desk). Check-out time is limited to five hours. Additional time can be requested if needed.

For information on how to use Dragon NaturallySpeaking, contact Felisa Osburn (785-532-3247, felisa@k-state.edu) in K-State Libraries.

AccessTech: Text-To-Speech bringing text to the ears


K-Access logo.
k-state.edu/dss/k-access


As I mentioned last month, one of the most basic needs for accessibility is readable text. For many students with disabilities, accessible text allows the computer to read documents out loud.  This is extremely helpful for students with learning disabilities, visual impairments, and also for students who speak English as a second language.

All students benefit from being able to search for terms, highlight text, and annotate readings; searchable PDF files make this possible.  Audible text can be a lifesaver for many people.

Many of us have scanned articles to PDF files. Did you know that there are two kinds of scans?

Continue reading “AccessTech: Text-To-Speech bringing text to the ears”