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Password-change deadline is Sept. 8

Wednesday, Sept. 8, is the fall deadline for all K-Staters to change passwords on their K-State eIDs. This mandate is for individual eIDs and group eIDs. After Sept. 8, those with unchanged passwords lose access to webmail, iSIS, K-State Online, free laser printing, InfoCommons computers, and other IT resources.

K-State will never ask for your eID password via e-mail. Immediately delete any e-mail that asks for your password (it’s a phishing scam). Continue reading “Password-change deadline is Sept. 8”

Changed your eID password? Deadline is Sept. 8

Wednesday, Sept. 8, is the deadline for changing passwords on K-State eIDs for the fall semester. This mandatory password change each fall and spring semester applies to both individual eIDs and group eIDs. It prevents long-term use of the same password (a known risk factor) and is the reason passwords cannot be reused in a two-year period.

Password-change timeframe starts Aug. 1

Aug. 1-Sept. 8 is the timeframe for all K-Staters to change their K-State eID passwords for the fall semester. This mandatory password change occurs each fall and spring, and applies to both individual eIDs and group eIDs. After Sept. 8, those with unchanged passwords will lose access to K-State webmail, iSIS, K-State Online, free laser printing, university computing labs and InfoCommons computers, and more.

An e-mail reminder is typically sent to K-Staters with unchanged passwords prior to the password deadline. But K-State will never ask for your eID password via e-mail. Continue reading “Password-change timeframe starts Aug. 1”

Password change period ends Wednesday, Feb. 10

The eID password-change period for this spring is Jan. 1-Feb. 10. If your password is not changed by Feb. 10, you will LOSE ACCESS to central e-mail, iSIS, K-State Online, K-State dial-in Internet service, free laser printing, university computing labs, and other IT services.

To change your password, go to eid.k-state.edu and sign in. Under Password Settings, click “Change your eID password or password-reset options” and follow the prompts.

After changing your eID password, you may also need to change the password settings for your K-State dial-in Internet service or your local e-mail client.

Continue reading “Password change period ends Wednesday, Feb. 10”

Spring 2010: Five things you need to know about IT security at K-State

In 2009, 431 K-Staters were duped by spear-phishing scam e-mails and gave away their eID password to criminals, who then used the stolen information to sign in to webmail and send hundreds of thousands of spam messages. Obviously, the first thing on this semester’s top-five security list must be:

  1. Never give your password to anyone in an e-mail message. K-State was plagued by nearly 300 instances of e-mail scams in 2009 that try to trick people into replying with their eID password. It has not slowed down in 2010. If you remember this one simple rule, you can prevent becoming a victim of these scams: K-State IT support staff will never ask for your password in an e-mail, nor will any legitimate business or organization. If you get such an e-mail, just delete it.
  2. Continue reading “Spring 2010: Five things you need to know about IT security at K-State”

K-State eID passwords have new limit of 30 characters

The timeframe for changing passwords on K-State eIDs started Aug. 1 and runs through Wednesday, Sept. 9, the deadline for changing passwords for the fall semester. The standard rules apply, with one exception — now passwords can be up to 30 characters long (minimum is still seven characters). This change is the result of two years of planning, programming, and coordination across K-State’s central computing systems.

This change is due, in part, to feedback from K-Staters that it was frustrating to limit passwords to 7-8 characters. Longer passwords can be more complex and are more secure since, as a general rule, the longer the password, the more difficult it is to crack. Another benefit is that K-Staters can create passwords based on information segments that are easier to remember, such as word phrases and number sequences.

Continue reading “K-State eID passwords have new limit of 30 characters”

Reminder: K-State will never ask for your password in an e-mail

Once again, K-State students, faculty, and staff are the target for spammers trying to trick you into divulging your eID and password in order to compromise your K-State e-mail account and use it to send more spam to thousands of others. Numerous instances of these scams have cropped up this week. This is a reminder that K-State will never ask for your password in an e-mail. For additional information on IT security, see the Jan. 20 InfoTech Tuesday article, “Five Things You Need to Know about IT Security at K-State“.

eID password deadline is only a week away (Feb. 11)

Wednesday, Feb. 11, is the deadline for all K-Staters to change the password on their eIDs for spring semester. This includes individual eIDs as well as group accounts. To change your eID password, go to the eid.k-state.edu site, sign in to your eProfile, and under Password Settings, click “Change your eID password or password-reset options.

Continue reading “eID password deadline is only a week away (Feb. 11)”

Don’t forget to change your password in Dreamweaver too!

After you change your eID password, if you use Dreamweaver’s FTP function, don’t forget to change your password in Dreamweaver, too. To change your password in Dreamweaver, do the following:

  1. On the Site menu, click Manage Sites.
  2. Highlight the site you want to change your password for and then click Edit.
  3. Click the Advanced tab.
  4. Under Category (on the left), click Remote Info.
  5. In the Password box, type your new password.
  6. Click OK and then click Done.

Choosing security questions/answers; lessons learned from Palin e-mail hack and password security

The compromise of Alaska Governor Sarah Palin’s Yahoo! e-mail account last September offers many lessons about security, including the risk of using a free commodity e-mail service for conducting official business. Likewise, be cautious about what you store in your e-mail — the hacker posted some of Palin’s e-mail messages, photos, and her address book on the Internet. However, the focus of this article stems from the technique used by the hacker (purported to be a student from the University of Tennessee) to access Palin’s e-mail.

The perpetrator was able to change Palin’s password by answering three security questions — her date of birth, home zip code, and where she met her husband — answers easily discovered through simple Google searches. Challenge-response systems like these are common security features used in self-service websites for resetting a forgotten password, like the site used by the hacker to reset Palin’s Yahoo! password and access her e-mail. Even K-State’s eID Profile system uses a challenge-response security question to facilitate self-service password resets. Continue reading “Choosing security questions/answers; lessons learned from Palin e-mail hack and password security”