SoftChalk LessonBuilder is an authoring tool that helps create digital learning objects for e-learning.  This will provide an overview of how to create a “Hot Spot”.

A Hot Spot taps into spatial understandings by having a learner look at an image or a map and learn about different regions.

After you have started the SoftChalk LessonBuilder software, go to Insert -> Activity -> Hot Spot
sclb-insert-activity-hot-spot

A Hot Spot Activity window will open.

sclb-hot-spot-activity-window

You need to select a digital image with one of the following formats:  .jpeg, .jpg, .gif, or .png. Then click the  Select image button. Identify the selected image, and then click the Map Image button.

then-map-image

In the next screen, you will have a choice of setting up a Hot Spot in one of two modes.  “Explore” mode displays the text in the selected areas of the image with a mouse rollover.  “Quiz” mode requires the student to click on the image to acquire the textual information.

In this screen, you also will enter the text that will show when a Hot Spot is rolled over with a cursor.  Below the text box are the tools that may be used to define the area(s) of the Hot Spot in the image to the left.

sclb-select-activity-mode-and-hotspot-text-and-hotspot-area

The pencil allows you to shade the image that will be responsive as a hot spot. The eraser removes the shaded areas.

The bottom row of boxes changes the size of the pencil nib. The whole area that should “activate” with a rollover of the mouse cursor should be shaded, as shown below.

identifying-hot-spots-on-the-image

The antique map of the world (above) by de Wit F. “Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Tabula Auctore” is based on a copper engraving.  The continents in the Eastern hemisphere are conceptualized as crowded land masses.  Comparatively, the Western hemisphere lacks a lot of details.

Click Save and Close. Click the Finish button.  Save the entire Hot Spot.

The final image works as follows:

final-ancient-map-as-a-hot-spot

Note that the text that is displayed during rollover is limited, so it may help to have the information dispersed in different hot spots across a particular image.