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Extension Entomology

Tag: Chinch bugs

Sorghum Update

–by Dr. Jeff Whitworth and Dr. Holly Schwarting

 

Chinch bugs are very active in double cropped sorghum in north central Kansas.  They are also numerous in corn but the field corn is mature enough that chinch bug feeding should be of little consequence.  However, young sorghum plants, especially under less than ideal growing conditions may be seriously stressed.

For more information on chinch bug biology, management decisions, and insecticides registered to control chinch bugs please see the Sorghum Insect Management Guide: https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/pubs/mf742.pdf

and Chinch Bugs: https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/pubs/MF3107.pdf

 

 

Sorghum Pest Update

— by Dr. Jeff Whitworth and Dr. Holly Schwarting

The situation seems about the same throughout north central Kansas with regard to insect pests.  Still finding mixed populations of aphids (greenbugs, corn leaf, yellow sugarcane, and sugarcane) but beneficial insect populations (mainly green lacewings, lady beetles, parasitic wasps, and occasionally syrphid fly larvae) still remain plentiful.  Headworms are also plentiful in just about every field that is not yet at soft dough.  Remember, expect 5% loss/worm/head between flowering and soft dough.  Chinch bugs, both adults and nymphs, are also plentiful at the base of most plants but can also be found feeding on young developing berries in the heads.

Sorghum Update

–by Dr. Jeff Whitworth and Dr. Holly Schwarting

Chinch bugs are really common in sorghum fields throughout north central Kansas.  Their feeding will weaken stalks if dry conditions are prevalent.

Green lacewing eggs were present, indicating the presence of future beneficials to help with control of potential future aphid populations.

lacewing egg

chinch bug nymps2

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