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Extension Entomology

Tag: wheat aphids

Wheat Update – Aphids

–by Dr. Jeff Whitworth and Dr. Holly Schwarting

Wheat aphids have really started showing up in wheat fields throughout north central Kansas.  English grain and bird cherry-oat aphids are the two most commonly observed so far.

These aphids usually do not build up in sufficient populations to stress wheat or impact yield, especially when growing conditions are good, which they have been for the last couple of weeks.  These aphids can vector barley yellow dwarf virus, however at this time of year this should not impact yield.  These aphids are providing a plentiful food source for lady beetles, and all wheat fields sampled in the last seven days contained significant numbers of lady beetles.

Therefore, it is prudent not to spray for these wheat aphids unless there are 20+/tiller on a field-wide basis.  Especially do not include an insecticide in a mixture with a fungicide “just in case”.

Volunteer Wheat

–by Dr. Jeff Whitworth and Dr. Holly Schwarting

Frequent rain over the last few weeks has played havoc with volunteer wheat control.  Each rain seems to bring another flush of volunteer.

volunteer-wheat

 

This is an ideal situation for most wheat pests, i.e. Hessian flies, winter grain mites, wheat curl mite, and the wheat aphids (mainly greenbugs, bird cherry oat and English grain) as well as the pathogens they may vector.  Thus, please remember to destroy all volunteer at least 2 weeks prior to planting to help manage these pests.

Wheat Update

By — Dr. Jeff Whitworth, Dr. Holly Schwarting

Wheat fields sampled in NC Kansas over the last week have diminishing populations of aphids.  Many fields had to be sampled relatively vigorously to find any aphids.  However, lady beetles are still quite plentiful which should bode well for not allowing the aphid populations to rebound.

Scattered white heads are starting to be easily distinguished in the green wheat.  If the stem pulls out easily, with some apparent feeding in the stem, this is from the wheat stem maggot.

wheat stem maggot

The number of infested stems in always negligible relative to yield loss but often causes concern because of the easily noticed white heads.

Wheat – Aphids

—by Dr. Jeff Whitworth – Dr. Holly Schwarting – J.R. Ewing and Salehe Abbar & Dr. Brian McCornack

Wheat aphids, primarily greenbugs, but bird cherry oat and English grain aphids as well, continue to migrate into wheat fields all over the state. However, there are increasing numbers of lady beetles and parasitic wasps (see photo of mummy). Hopefully these beneficials will keep these aphids well below treatment thresholds.

Screen Shot 2015-05-02 at 9.46.18 AM

More information about greenbug identification,  current management recommendations, or their natural enemies can be found on the myFields.info website (www.myfields.info).

 

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