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K-State Turfgrass

Author: jahoyle

Cooler weather brings the return of the Mesonet Freeze Monitor

(Chip Redmond, Mary Knapp and Dan Regier; Weather Data Library/Mesonet)

Cold weather is making its appearance with frost advisories issued this last weekend and freeze warnings this week. The average freeze date in northwest Kansas is as early as the last week in September. However, southeast Kansas does not usually see freezing temperatures until the end of October. Average dates for the first occurrence of 24-degree F temperatures are even later.

For more information check out the KSU Agronomy eUpdate.

https://webapp.agron.ksu.edu/agr_social/m_eu_article.throck?article_id=2358

Wild Violet Control

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Wild violet or common blue violet is a persistent perennial broadleaf weed commonly found in thin, shaded turfgrass. The plant has heart-shaped, shiny leaves and can spread by rhizomes which makes it a difficult to control weed. The flowers are deep purple or bluish purple. There are many similar species but collectively, turfgrass managers just refer to them as wild violet.

Control has been difficult but can be achieve if you choose the right herbicide and rate. Triclopyr has proven to be effective in cool-season turfgrass and is contained in many different products that are on the market. But the key is to make sure that you apply more than 0.5 lbs ae/A of triclopyr to result in effective control. Not all products that contain triclopyr when applied at the recommended rate will have enough triclopyr for effective control.

At a quick glace through the Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals manual (Get you copy here – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=20239) I found a table that shows the rates of triclopyr-delivered by various products at the low and high label rate. From that chart, the following are products that contain ≥ 0.5 lbs ae/A of triclopyr, when applied at the correct rate.

  • Aquasweep
  • Chaser 2 Amine
  • Chaser
  • Crossroad
  • Everett
  • Confront
  • 2-D
  • Tailspin
  • Turflon Ester Ultra
  • Triclopyr 4
  • Trycera

The take home message; To control wild violet in cool-season turfgrass use tricopyr (0.5 lbs ae/A), may different products contain triclopyr, not all products contain enough triclopyr, choose a product that when applied at the correct rate will result in at least 0.5 lbs ae/A of triclopyr.

If you are needing to control wild violet in bermduagrass or zoysiagrass; metsulfuron, sulfentrazon + metsulfuron and flazasulfuron are effective. Repeat applications are often required regardless of the herbicide.

Also, fall applications are best followed by spring applications.

Information from this post if from “Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals” To get your copy today click here – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=20239

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

White Clover and Yellow Woodsorrel Control

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

White clover is one of the most common weeds found in cool-season turfgrass.  It can grow in a wide range of environmental conditions and can tolerate many of our cultural practices.   It can also spread by seeds and by stolons. White clover is a perennial broadleaf weed that has trifoliate leaves that may or may not have a wedged-shaped mark. Although it is called white clover the flowers are white but may turn pink as they age.

Because white clover can fix its own nitrogen some see it as an important species to add beneficial soil nitrogen.  There had been some work done to explore using both clover and turfgrass in a mixture in their lawns.  Others may consider it as a weed.

If you consider it a weed, fall is a great time to try and control it.  But did you know 2,4-D, glyphosate and sulfentrazone do not control white clover?

For best control herbicides that contain clopyralid, dicamba, fluroxypyr, florasulam, metsulfruon, and/or quinclorac (also controls crabgrass) provide the best control when applied in the fall.

Yellow woodsorrel (Oxalis stricta) is a perennial or annual broadleaf weed that has clover-like trifoliate heart shaped leaves.  Yellow woodsorrel most commonly spreads by seeds that are contained in a capsule that when it explodes ejects the seeds.  It can be confused with clover but has yellow flowers with five petals.  You can find this weed in a wide range of soil conditions and can commonly be confused with black medic, birdsfoot trefoil and white clover. A similar species is creeping woodsorrel but it is most commonly found in landscape plantings while yellow woodsorrel is most commonly found in turf.

To control oxalis, herbicides that contain triclopyr and fluroxypyr are very effective.

Herbicides that contain fluroxypyr include;

  • Battleship III
  • Escalade 2
  • Momentum FX2
  • Tailspin
  • Vista XRT

Herbicides that contain triclopyr include;

  • 2-D
  • 4-Speed XT
  • Battleship III
  • Chaser
  • Chaser 2 amine
  • Confront
  • Cool Power
  • Eliminate
  • Horsepower
  • Momentum  FX2
  • Tailspin
  • Three-Way Ester II
  • Turflon Ester Ultra
  • Turflon II amine
  • Triclopyr 4
  • TZONE

Always remember a healthy turfgrass stand through proper maintenance is the best weed control and can help minimize clover and yellow woodsorrel in you turfgrass.

Information from this post if from “Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals” To get your copy today click here – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=20239

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

It is that time of year to start working on your cool-season lawn!

 

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

It is that time of year again to start working on your cool-season lawn.  To try and cover it all, I have listed a couple posts from the past that can help you get that lawn into shape.  I also have added a list of publications. Enjoy!

Time to fertilize cool-season turfgrass

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/time-to-fertilize-cool-season-turfgrass/ 

 Monthly calendar for cool-season lawns for the rest of the year

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/monthly-calendar-for-cool-season-lawns-for-the-rest-of-2017/

 Power raking or core aeration – That is the question!

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/power-raking-or-core-aeration-that-is-the-question/

 The art of knowing your seed label

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/the-art-of-knowing-your-seed-label/

 For seeding success, pay attention to other crop on the seed label

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/for-seeding-success-pay-attention-to-other-crop-on-the-seed-label/

 

Publications

Lawn Fertilizing Guide – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=10639

Recycling your grass clippings  – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=701

Mowing your lawn – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=615

 Tall Fescue Lawns – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=1460

Watering New Lawns – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=1337

 Planting a Home Lawn – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=595

 Aerating Your Lawn – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=713

 Kentucky Bluegrass Lawns – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=713

 

Check out the KSRE Bookstore for more publications – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Category.aspx?id=528&catId=545

KGSCA Legacy Scholarship

The KGCSA Legacy Scholarship offers educational aid to the children and grandchildren of KGCSA members.  A $1,000 scholarship will be awarded. Applications are due August 27, 2019.

Eligibility
1. One or more of the applicant’s parents or grandparents must have been a KGCSA member for five or more consecutive years and must be a currently active.

2. The student must be enrolled full-time at an accredited institution of higher learning, or in the case of high school seniors, must be accepted at such an institution for the next academic year. Graduating high school seniors must attach a letter of acceptance to their application.

3. Past winners are ineligible to apply the following year. They may reapply after a one-year hiatus.

Criteria for Selection
1. Applicants will be evaluated based on academic achievement, extracurricular and community involvement, leadership and outside employment.

2. The student must submit an original essay of up to 500 words.

You can download the application at  www.kgcsa.org

HAGCSA Turfgrass Student Scholarships

SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY – 2019

The Heart of America GCSA Scholarship Program offers educational aid to deserving students in the turfgrass program at an accredited college or university in Kansas or Missouri.

A total up to $5,000 is allocated each year to deserving students. Applicants will compete based on their overall qualifications determined by the Scholarship and Research Committee.

Applicants:
2019 academic term

(Must carry a 2.75GPA or higher for consideration.)

Application:
Scholarship Application – 2019

Deadline:
October 31, 2019

Submit to:

Heart of America GCSA

Scholarship & Research Committee

638 W. 39th Street, Kansas City, MO 64111

Questions:

Kim Weitzel; kweitzel@westerneda.com

 

Rust on Turfgrass

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Last week I came home after the KSU Turfgrass Annual Field Day that was held in Olathe, KS at the Olathe Horticulture Research and Extension Center and before I even made it into the house I knew I had rust in our back yard.  The shoes in the garage were a dead give away. The shoes that my wife were wearing in the back yard were orange. This disease can occur just about anywhere, when the leaves of turf are wet and when plants are stressed they are more susceptible.  We see it on perennial ryegrass but can occur on other species.

Don’t worry too much as the turf typically can grow out of it.

For more information on rust check out the KSU publication below, some past blog posts from Dr. Megan Kennelly and myself, as well as some information from Richard Jauron at Iowa State University.

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/pubs/EP163.pdf

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/tag/rust/

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/rust-activity-in-turfgrass/

https://hortnews.extension.iastate.edu/2019/07/rust-turfgrass?fbclid=IwAR2MhIyvUjMSn0BLsHXvpFrtmaQrlcau-h6MH-R1gwWmag2qJ5DfF7jWlhA

 

Watering Your Lawn – Resources

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

I’m going to say it because everyone else is thinking of it. As soon as we started to complain about all the rain, it stops and now its hot and dry.  So to help out here are two recently updated publications with information on watering your lawn.

Did you know that about half of the water applied to lawns is wasted? This fact sheet offers tips on turfgrass selection, soil preparation, and maintenance practices to increase watering efficiency.

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=670

Suggestions for homeowners on maintaining a healthy, attractive lawn while conserving water.

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=363&pubId=663

**** Picture looks blurry doesn’t it!  Thats because this picture was taken when the irrigation was running while it was raining outside. Make sure you take control of your irrigation otherwise it will take control of your lawn…****

Under Attack from Weeds

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

As a turfgrass manager, as soon as you think you have it under control… BAM, you are under attack. Just in a short period of time Manhattan has been under attack from weeds. Now many of these weeds are large and hard to control.

With all the rain earlier in the season there was standing water in many of the low areas of the research farm. The turf did not like it and eventually died. But what did like it was yellow nutsedge. I put up some information about this in the recent past but, it is everywhere and I am still getting phone calls about it so I wanted to direct you to the most recent post on controlling yellow nutsedge.

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/yellow-nutsedge-reported-across-ks/

Also, you can use glyphosate to treat yellow nutsedge in landscape beds but it only provides marginal control. Remember not to use glyphosate to treat yellow nutsedge in your turf.

Crabgrass galore! Slow to start but it is going strong now! Anywhere we didn’t put down a preemergent herbicide this year crabgrass has started to take over. Good thing there is options for control. Check out my earlier post for crabgrass options. Pay attention to control options for larger tillered crabgrass.

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/postemergent-crabgrass-control-2/


If it is not yellow nutsedge or crabgrass it is goosegrass. Back in early June, goosegrass emergence was reported across Kansas. Now the goosegrass is growing and going to be more difficult to control because it has tillered out. Make sure you make your follow-up applications when recommended and choose your control options that are effective on larger goosegrass.

If you have cool-season turfgrass then you can use fenoxaprop (Acclaim Extra), fluazifop (Fusilade II), tropramizone (Pylex), or MSMA (golf courses and sod farms only!).  You will have to do more than one application since the goosegrass is tillered out.  Sulfentrazone (Dismiss) is also effective on goosegrass if it has not tillered out yet so might want to go with another option since now the goosegrass is big.

For all you golf courses out there that have creeping bentgrass fairways it is going to be a little bit more difficult because the herbicides that work best tend to injure the turf.  1-Tiller or smaller can be controlled with fenoxaprop (Acclaim Extra) at 3.5 fl oz/A but you will need to re-apply every two weeks to make sure you are applying to small plants. This could be a follow-up option if new goosegrass starts to emerge before the season it over.

As crazy as it sounds a herbicide that has commonly been used for broadleaf weeds has shown control on goosegrass.  SpeedZone (2,4-D +dicamba + MCPP) has shown control but a follow up application is going to be needed 30 days after initial application. Pay attention to the temperature restrictions in this heat!

Tropramizone (Pylex) can be used on bentgrass at lower rates (0.25 fl oz/A) but definitely need a repeat application at 21 days

Now if you have bermudagrass or zoysiagrass then you can use Tribute TOTAL (thiencarbazone + foramsulfuron + halosulfuron).  Fusilade II and Acclaim Extra that works in cool-season grass can also be used on zoysiagrass.  If you mix these products with triclopyr (Turflon Ester Ultra or Triclopyr 4) then you will get better results.

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

Information in this article is from Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals.

Patton, A.J., M. Elmore, J. Hoyle, J. Kao-Kniffin, B. Branham, T. Voigt, N. Christians, A. Thoms, G. Munshaw, A. Hathaway, T. Nikolai, B. Horgan, L. Miller, X. Xiong, W. Kreuser, R. Gaussoin, D. Gardner, Z. Raudenbush, D. Li, P. Landschoot, D. Soldat, and P. Koch. 2019 Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals. Purdue University Extension Publication. TURF-100. pp. 128.

Get your copy here – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=20239

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

In the midst of a summer with 100+ F temperatures

In 2016, Dr. Fry wrote a blog post titled “Bentgrass Declining? It’s from Western Europe – You Live in Kansas”. Last year we faced high summer temperatures and this year we are facing the same. Like many across the state and beyond, the bentgrass greens at Rocky Ford Turfgrass Research Center are stressed.  To address the summer stress on bentgrass greens I think that it is a good idea to revisit this topic.

Below is Dr. Fry’s article. Enjoy!

In the midst of a summer with 100+ F temperatures, it’s worthwhile to consider some of creeping bentgrass’s preferences and management strategies that might be helpful to reduce its stress, and yours.  See, the thing about creeping bentgrass on putting greens is….

  • It came from Western Europe. You live in Kansas.
Average July maximum temperature (°F) Average July minimum temperature (°F)
London, England 72 55
Manhattan, Kansas 90 68

 

  • Its roots die first, then its leaves. Keep the roots happy and you’ll have happy bentgrass and happy golfers.
  • Its roots prefer to grow at 55 to 65 °F; root growth slows even as low as 80 °F. This summer, temperatures near the surface of greens have been over 100 °F.
  • Faults with construction, drainage, management practices may produce a quality turf surface for 10 or 11 months of the year. It’s the one or two other months that cause problems.   If you want to avoid bentgrass decline, then start with a good rootzone.
  • Rootzones that hold water are warmer and also have less oxygen for root growth. If you don’t have an ideal rootzone, work to improve it in the fall and spring with aggressive core aerification and topdressing.
  • The benefits of coring are often seen during summer stress. Why are there green polka dots within the brown turf?  Turf in those spots has roots!

  • Opening the green’s surface with small, solid tines or spikes can help with water infiltration and root growth during midsummer. Don’t overdo it – the turf is under stress.
  • Although superintendents suspect (and often hope) that a disease is causing the problem in mid-summer, over half of the samples that are evaluated in our lab show no disease.
  • In our climate, air movement across the surface of the green is critical for bentgrass health. If your greens are surrounded, let them free!
  • Maximize summer airflow from the south, but also vent to the north (just like opening two windows to get cross flow in your house).
  • Hand watering can be used to address deficiencies in water distribution of the irrigation system, target localized dry spots, and deal with inconsistencies in water retention and drainage in the root zone. It shouldn’t be overdone or underdone- train and use your best help for handwatering.
  • Syringing refers to applying a light mist of water droplets to leaves only, and then relying upon evaporation of that water to help cool the leaf surface. How effective do you think that is on a humid, July day?  Not very, unless you use a fan to encourage evaporation from the leaf!
  • Trees use light for photosynthesis, so does bentgrass. If trees are shading the green, which is getting the light – the tree, or the turf?
  • Cultivars that are more dense get less Poa invasion, and Poa is more likely to die during summer stress than bentgrass. Plant newer, denser cultivars to reduce Poa.( The photo shows Poa checking out in the heat.)

  • Light applications of nitrogen can be beneficial during heat stress (0.10 lb. N/1,000 sq. ft.)
  • Newer cultivars have been shown to be more heat tolerant than Penncross, but even these will experience decline during prolonged heat.
  • Clean up laps are often the first to show symptoms of stress. Why?  Excessive traffic and wear.  Have you considered a dedicated mower with a slightly higher mowing height for the clean up lap?  Do you skip clean up laps on some days?