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K-State Turf and Landscape Blog

Category: Research

Turfgrass Field Day Series

By Dr. Jack Fry and Alex Bach

Turfgrass Field Day would have been on August 6th, 2020, had we been able to have an in-person event this summer. This is certainly a first! For that reason, we’re offering a few short video summaries of research projects being conducted by K-State faculty and researchers.  In this video by Alex Bach, M.S. student in Horticulture, he discusses subsurface irrigation and how it impacts establishment of turfgrass from seed.

2020 Turfgrass Field Day Series Video 5 – Subsurface Irrigation by Alex Bach (Link Here)

Turfgrass Field Day Series

By Dr. Jack Fry, featuring video by Mu Hong

Turfgrass Field Day would have been on August 6th, 2020, had we been able to have an in-person event this summer. This is certainly a first! For that reason, we’re offering a few short video summaries of research projects being conducted by K-State faculty and researchers. Videos don’t exceed 5 minuets, and the forth video in the series, by Mu Hong, current Ph.D. student in Horticulture, is featured below. Mu discusses minimum water requires that are required for Kentucky bluegrass and tall fescue to survive long drought periods.

2020 Field Day Video Series Video 4 Part 1 – Mu Hong (Link Here)

2020 Field Day Video Series Video 4 Part 2 – Mu Hong (Link Here)

For more details on related research conducted on zoysiagrass by Mu and Dr. Dale Bremer, click on the link below to see an article in the 2020 K-State Turfgrass Research Report:  https://newprairiepress.org/kaesrr/vol6/iss7/2/

Turfgrass Field Day Series

By Dani McFadden

Turfgrass Field Day would have been on August 6th, 2020, had we been able to have an in-person event this summer. This is certainly a first! For that reason, we’re offering a few short video summaries of research projects being conducted by K-State faculty and researchers. Videos don’t exceed 5 minuets, and the third video in the series, by Dani McFadden, current M.S. student in Horticulture, is featured below. You will see more videos in the coming weeks.

2020 Field Day Series Video 3 (Link Here): Research Update by Dani McFadden

For more details on this research, click on the link below to see an article in the 2020 K-State Turfgrass Research Report:

https://newprairiepress.org/kaesrr/vol6/iss7/1/

Turfgrass Field Day Video Series

By Manoj Chhetri
Turfgrass Field Day would have been on August 6th, 2020, had we been able to have an in-person event this summer. This is certainly a first! For that reason, we’re offering a few short video summaries of research projects being conducted by K-State faculty and researchers. Videos don’t exceed 5 minuets, and the second video in the series is featured below. You will see more videos in the coming weeks.
Irrigation Strategies to Save Water on ‘Innovation’ Zoysiagrass
Manoj Chhetri
For more details on this research, click on the link below to see an article in the 2020 K-State Turfgrass Research Report: https://newprairiepress.org/kaesrr/vol6/iss7/3/

 

Turfgrass Field Day Video Series

By Dr. Jack Fry

Turfgrass Field Day would have been on August 6 had we been able to have an in-person event this summer – this is a first!  For that reason, we’re offering a few short video summaries of research projects being done by K-State faculty and researchers.  Videos don’t exceed 5 minutes – the first is below, and you’ll see more in the coming weeks.
Zoysiagrass NTEP Study at the Olathe Horticulture Center
Dr. Jack Fry
Here are some related summaries of progress on zoysiagrass research from the 2020 Turfgrass Research Report:

 

Today would have been the 2020 Turfgrass Field Day!!!

By Brooke Garcia

Did you know that today would have been the K-State Turfgrass Field Day? We wish we could be together at Rocky Ford in Manhattan — presenting research, providing problem diagnosis, networking with our commercial exhibitors, and gazing at the amazing equipment displays!

We do plan to post written and video research updates throughout the remainder of the year on the Turf and Landscape Blog, accessible through our website: https://www.k-state.edu/turf/

Be sure to tune in over the next couple of weeks. We will be highlighting research and providing some awesome visuals of Rocky Ford Research Station in honor of the 2020 Turfgrass Field Day.

Thanks for your continued support! We can’t wait to connect again in-person one day. May the grass be greener on the other side.

Dr. Keeley to Serve as Permanent Department Head of HNR

We had to share this exciting news that our very own Turfgrass research and teacher professor has been named the head of the Department of Horticulture and Natural Resources. 

Here is the most recent press release that was released on August 6, 2020.

Keeley tabbed to lead horticulture and natural resources at K-State 

Longtime professor has experience in teaching, research and extension 

MANHATTAN, Kan. – Steve Keeley, who is beginning his 25th year in teaching, research and extension at Kansas State University, has been named the head of the Department of Horticulture and Natural Resources.

Keeley was the department’s interim leader since October, 2018. Ernie Minton, dean of the College of Agriculture, recently announced that Keeley will now move into the position permanently.

“As a longtime member of the K-State faculty, Steve is well-positioned to lead the department in adapting to emerging challenges brought on by the pandemic, while recognizing the opportunities for building on the department’s areas of strength,” Minton said. “Steve’s calm demeanor, coupled with the esteem in which he is held by his colleagues, will serve the department very well.”

Keeley will lead a department that includes programs in horticulture, park management and conservation, and wildlife and outdoor enterprise management. He said he is especially excited about working with “wonderful faculty who are nationally and internationally known for their outstanding teaching, research and extension accomplishments.”

The department’s undergraduate programs each rate in the top five nationally and K-State graduates are in high demand, he said, “not only in Kansas, but across the nation.”

“The research our faculty and graduate students are doing is so diverse and impactful; it’s exciting and really keeps me on my toes,” Keeley said. “We are also known for our innovative extension programs that serve the needs of Kansans and beyond the state.”

For most of his career, Keeley has held an 80% teaching and 20% research appointment in the department. His research interests include low-input turfgrass management and weed control, and he has published more than 175 articles, reports and abstracts on his research – including 34 refereed journal articles.

He has served as a senior editor for the professional journal, Crop, Forage and Turfgrass Management, and is on the editorial board of the NACTA Journal, published by the North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture. Keeley is also a teaching fellow for NACTA.

In 2014, he received the prestigious Crop Science Society Teaching Award, just the second turfgrass scientist ever to receive that honor. During his K-State career, he has helped to acquire more than $1.1 million in grant funding for research.

His teaching duties include introductory horticulture, horticultural pest management, turfgrass management and turfgrass pest management. He also advises undergraduates in K-State’s golf course and sports turf management program.

Keeley earned undergraduate and doctoral degrees from Colorado State University, and a master’s degree from Michigan State University.

“I am honored and humbled to be entrusted to lead the Department of Horticulture and Natural Resources at K-State,” Keeley said. “The people in this department are second to none, and I am excited to work together with them to continue making the department elite nationally.”

Learn more about the department online at https://hnr.k-state.edu.

Story by: 

Pat Melgares P: 785-532-1160 E: melgares@ksu.edu

Zoysiagrass Seedhead Suppression

By Dr. Jack Fry

Below-average spring temperatures and a lot of cloud cover haven’t been beneficial for growth of warm-season grasses. Nevertheless, days are getting longer, and Meyer zoysia began to produce seedheads in northeast Kansas last week. Significant work was done at K-State on zoysia seedhead suppression by Dr. Jared Hoyle, along with Dr. Aaron Patton at Purdue University. Seedheads on Meyer have a purple tone to them, but after mowing, the seed stalks leave an undesirable white cast on golf course fairways and tees. The plant growth regulator ethephon (trade name Proxy) is effective at suppressing zoysia seedheads if it is applied at the proper time the previous autumn. Manoj Chhetri, a current Ph.D. student, is working on better refining application time for Proxy to suppress zoysia seedheads. The Golf Course Superintendents Association of America, along with the Heart of America Golf Course Superintendents Association and Kansas Turfgrass Foundation, are sponsoring this zoysia seedhead suppression research that is summarized in Golf Course Management magazine (link below).

https://www.gcmonline.com/course/environment/news/zoysiagrass-seedheads

Seedheads are just beginning to emerge on Meyer zoysiagrass in Olathe, KS. Best suppression of the seedheads occurs when the growth regulator Proxy is applied in autumn.

Progress in Bermudagrass Breeding

By Dr. Jack Fry

This is the time of year when we hope all warm-season grasses green up uniformly with no signs of winter injury.  K-State researchers have been working with Dr. Yanqi Wu, bermudagrass breeder at Oklahoma State University (OSU), for the past several years.  Dr. Wu is consistently working to improve bermuda cold hardiness and release improved cultivars for the transition zone region of the U.S.  ‘Latitude 36’ and ‘Northbridge’, a couple of high quality, vegetatively propagated bermudas, were released by OSU in 2010.  These have been used extensively on sports fields and golf courses.  However, there have been some winters in which significant winter injury occurred to these cultivars in Kansas.  In the article linked below, you’ll see that some of the new bermudas that are being evaluated by OSU and K-State have superior freezing tolerance to any of the existing cultivars in use.  This likely means that in the next several years, we’ll have improved bermudas for our region that will be more likely to tolerate extremely cold winters.
Article here:

https://newprairiepress.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=7770&context=kaesr