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Hot off the press….Grub Management in Turfgrass Using Insecticides

This new publication by Dr. Raymond Cloyd addresses factors that influence insecticide effectiveness for grub species and offers recommendations for control. To learn more about maximizing the effectiveness of grub control in Turfgrass, be sure to visit K-State Research and Extension Bookstore. 
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KGCSA Cliff Dipman Internship Award

The KGCSA Cliff Dipman Internship Award consists of two $2,000 awards to Kansas State University students working at a golf course whose superintendent is a member of the KGCSA. One will be directed to a student doing an internship at a 9-hole golf course, and one doing an internship at an 18-hole facility. Applications will be reviewed by the KGCSA Board of Directors. All decisions of the committee will be final. Applicants will be notified of their status by March 30 of the year submitted.

Requirements:
• Must already be enrolled in a 4-year undergraduate turfgrass program at Kansas State University.
• Must intend to complete a 3- or 6-month internship at a golf course in the state of Kansas whose superintendent is a member of the KGCSA.
• One award will be available for a 9-hole intern and one for an 18-hole intern.
• Return completed application to: KGCSA Awards Program, 1712 Claflin, 2021 Throckmorton, Manhattan, KS 66506 or cdipman@ksu.edu by March 15, 2019.
• Application information can be found here

About the Namesake:
Cliff Dipman was the Golf Course Superintendent at Manhattan Country Club for 31 years. He has served as a mentor to countless students who have become successful golf course superintendents in Kansas and across the United States. Year after year, Cliff recognized the importance of the internship in complementing academics

Thank you, Exhibitors!

Dear Kansas Turfgrass Conference Exhibitors:

We would like to express our appreciation for your contribution to the
outstanding trade show at the 68th annual Kansas Turfgrass Conference in
conjunction with KNLA. We recognize the value of the trade show to our
conference and to the turfgrass industry. Your willingness to provide
information to the participants is very important.

The total registration over the 2 ½ days was about 556 attendees.

We hope the extra trade show time we built into the program helped, but
we would appreciate any feedback you might have for improvements.

The dates for the 2019 Kansas Turfgrass Conference – December 4, 5 & 6
at the Hilton Conference Center in Manhattan, Kansas. We hope you will join us at this new conference location.

The 2019 Kansas Turfgrass Field Day will be held on Thursday, August 1
at the K-State Research & Extension Center in Olathe.

If we can ever be of assistance to you, please let us know. Again,
thanks for your outstanding support!

Have a Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

Christy & Cliff Dipman

Jared Hoyle
Jack Fry
Steve Keeley
Megan Kennelly
Cheryl Boyer

Turf conference innovation showcase booth – share your favorite turf and landscape hacks!

Share your tips and tricks!

Do you have any special tips or tricks to managing turfgrass? Have you come up with your own method, style, or piece of equipment?

Do you have any unique methods for motivating employees, or working with difficult customers?

If so – email me at kennelly@ksu.edu and we’ll post them at the Kansas Turf Conference. Send me a description of your method, or perhaps a photo. We’ll display them and have a vote to determine the best innovation! Winner will get a prize 🙂

 

 

 

 

Mow-mulching fall leaves

The leaves are starting to fall. What to do with all that biomass? Don’t send it to the trash pile!

Many municipalities have local composting options. Another option is using a mower to mulch those leaves back down into the turf. Commercial landscape companies – as you work with homeowners for fall lawn/leaf services have you talked to your clients about these options?

For more information:

https://www.johnson.k-state.edu/lawn-garden/agent-articles/lawns/mulch-mowing-fall-leaves.html

Here is a video:

http://kansashealthyyards.org/index.php?option=com_allvideoshare&view=video&slg=tired-of-raking-try-mowing&Itemid=345

 

Pruning Trees and Shrubs in the Fall

(Ward Upham, KSU Horticulture & Natural Resources. Original source: http://www.ksuhortnewsletter.org/)

 

Pruning in August can stimulate new growth that is less hardy during the winter.  But what about pruning at this time of year?

Woody plants move sugars and other materials from the leaves to storage places in the woody portions of the plant just prior to leaf fall and we would like to maximize those stored energy reserves.  Even pruning later in the fall can cause a problem by reducing the cold hardiness of woody plants.  Dr. Rich Marini at Penn State Extension has written , “Based on everything that has been published we can conclude that woody plants do not attain maximum cold hardiness when they are pruned in the fall. Trees are affected more by heavy pruning than light pruning.”  However, this does not mean that woody plants pruned in the fall will necessarily suffer winter damage.  In most cases, I think you can get away with the old adage of “prune whenever your pruners are sharp.”  However, damage can occur if we have a sharp drop in temperature before plants are completely hardened off.  Also, marginally hardy plants are more susceptible to winter damage, especially if pruned in the fall.  Though light pruning and removal of dead wood are fine this time of year, you may want to delay severe pruning until spring.

Consider pruning to be “light” if 10% of less of the plant is removed. Dead wood does not count in this calculation.  Keep in mind that even light pruning of spring-blooming shrubs such as lilac and forsythia will reduce flowers for next year. We normally recommend that spring-bloomers be pruned after flowering.

Shrubs differ in how severely they can be cutback. Junipers do not break bud from within the plant and therefore should be trimmed lightly if you wish to keep the full shape. Overgrown junipers should be removed. On the other hand, there are certain shrubs that can be pruned back severely during the spring. Rejuvenation is the most severe type of pruning and may be used on multi-stem shrubs that have become too large with too many old branches to justify saving the younger canes. All stems are cut back to 3- to 5-inch stubs. This works well for spirea, forsythia, pyracantha, ninebark, Russian almond, sweet mock orange, shrub roses, and flowering quince. Just remember that spring is the correct time to do this, not now.

(Ward Upham)

Cool fall weather = large patch season

Here in Kansas we see our most severe large patch symptoms in spring, but we can see it in fall, especially if conditions are cool and wet. Here, also, we’ve had pretty good success at suppressing spring symptoms with applications the prior fall.

We at KSU and others have been busy trying to tackle this disease in recent years, especially with the increasing interest in zoysia. For a review of research across the transition zone you can check out this article in Golfdom:

Don’t get overmatched: Dispatch that large patch

 

What do you do well that nobody else does?

(Megan Kennelly, KSU Plant Pathology)

At the Kansas Turf Conference on December 4, 5 & 6, 2018 in Topeka we will have a new booth in the exhibit area for YOU to show off your best innovations!

Do you have a piece of equipment that you hacked together on your own? Something that saves you headaches? Are you willing to share your idea? If so – send me a quick photo and description. I’ll display it at the booth, with credit to you.

How about a method? Do you have a special knack for motivating your crew or co-workers? Write that down, and we can share it.

What about an innovative way to reach out to customers?

If you have a special tip or trick you are willing to share, send it my way. You can email me at kennelly@ksu.edu

At the booth we’ll have people vote on their favorite innovation, with a special prize for the winner!