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Beach Blog

Category: Exhibitions

WHAT’S HAPPENING…BEHIND THE SCENES  

Collections

Two years after the exhibition “Art for Every Home” filled the Beach Museum of Art galleries and then traveled to New York City and Syracuse, New York, the original prints, paintings, fabrics, and ceramics featured in the exhibition have returned to their respective homes. Borrowed from museums and private lenders across the country, a little over 100 objects were brought together to complement works of art in the Beach Museum’s own collection to present a comprehensive overview of the New York-based business, American Associated Artists.

While the registrars and collections management team are charged with the care and documentation of the permanent collection, they are also responsible for coordinating agreements, transportation, and care of loaned works of art for exhibitions. Such loans require special attention, including custom packaging, separate insurance, and climate-controlled, secure shipping. Sometimes, Beach Museum of Art staff coordinate professional conservation treatment that may be needed before an object can be loaned. In the case of “Art for Every Home,” the Beach Museum sent eighteen prints to conservation laboratories for treatment. The staff members often spend months preparing loan documents prior to an exhibition opening and, in the weeks after the exhibition closes, they communicate with lenders to coordinate the safe return of artwork.

All of the museum’s exhibitions involve extensive work behind the scenes, but those that include art loans and that travel to other museums require even more resources to help connect the museum’s collection with the larger world. Community support is vital for providing the resources museum staff members need to develop exhibitions and create meaningful experiences in the galleries and beyond for you, the viewer.

– Sarah Price, Registrar/Collections Manager and Theresa Ketterer, Assistant Registrar

2017 Fall exhibitions only have weeks left…

“Deeper” and “broader” are words that come to mind when I think about Fall 2017 exhibitions and programs at the museum. They represent connections with K-State departments and Kansas communities that are deeper and broader than ever before.  From the residency activities of Ubiquitous artist Enrico Isamu Ōyama, to the youth and school programs in conjunction with Sayaka Ganz’s Reclaimed Creations, to the glimpse of our regional past in Thrift Styles, to the  Fronteras/Frontiers  exhibition’s ambitious community outreach – these artistic projects will touch many lives!

I hope you will visit the Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art often during this busy fall to encounter the interesting sights created and ideas proposed by these exhibitions and related programs.  The museum aims to serve as a window to the world and to offer an invitation to think anew about this place, the Flint Hills and tall grass prairie of Kansas. We hope you agree that we are fulfilling our mission. Please join us in these adventures! And please note the listings of generous donors who make this work possible. They deserve our hearty and sincere thanks.

Linda Duke, Director

The Beach Museum of Art office and galleries will be closed November 23-25, 2017 and December 24, 2017 through January 1, 2018.

Sayaka Ganz: Reclaimed Creations

September 5 – December 9, 2017

In her sculpture, Sayaka Ganz uses reclaimed plastic objects such as discarded utensils as a painter uses brush strokes. She describes her style as “3D impressionism”: The recycled objects appear unified at a distance, but at close proximity, individual objects are discernable. Sculptures in this exhibition include animals in motion that are rich in color and energy. Ganz was born in Yokohama, Japan, and grew up living in Japan, Brazil, and Hong Kong. She holds a master of fine arts degree in sculpture from Bowling Green State University in Ohio. The Tour of “Sayaka Ganz: Reclaimed Creations” is produced by David J. Wagner, L.L.C., David J. Wagner, Ph.D., Curator/Tour Director.

Ubiquitous: Enrico Isamu Oyama

August 15 – December 23, 2017 

Enrico Isamu Ōyama represents a contemporary generation with a distinctly global perspective. Child of an Italian father and a Japanese mother, Ōyama grew up in Tokyo, Japan, lived for extended periods in North Italy, and has been working in New York since 2011. “Ubiquitous” surveys how Ōyama channeled his interests in Tokyo and American street cultures, Western abstract art, and Japanese calligraphy to create Quick Turn Structure (QTS), his signature expression. Appearing across a wide range of creative platforms, including painting, digital media, sound, and fashion, QTS gives visual form to the mixed-race, multicultural, transnational experiences of people in today’s world of fluid borders and interconnectivity.

Thrift Style

August 1 – December 16, 2017

The reuse of feed, flour, and sugar sacks in clothing and other household objects became popular during the mid-1920s. Businesses capitalized on interest by introducing bags with increasingly varied printed patterns. The sacks and other fabric scraps from manufacturers continued to serve thrifty home sewers during the Great Depression and into the 1960s. A collectors market for the bags and fabric remnants thrives today. This exhibition will explore the recycling of fabrics in clothing and quilts drawn from the collection of the Historic Costume and Textile Museum of Kansas State University. Varied feed bags from a 2016 gift to that museum will highlight the range of print motifs available to twentieth-century home sewers.

Ganz Artist Talk at the Beach Museum of Art

Artist talk by Sayaka Ganz
Thursday, November 9, 5:30 p.m.

Ganz will give a talk regarding her current exhibition at the Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art, Reclaimed Creations: Sayaka Ganz. There will be a small reception following the talk with time to look at the exhibition, if you haven’t already had the chance or would like to take another look at this amazing work.

Reclaimed Creations: Sayaka Ganz

Sayaka Ganz’s sculptures of birds, animals, and marine life incorporate discarded plastic objects that have become dangerous to wild creatures. Her works in this exhibition foreground the need to rethink human use and disposal of objects in a world driven by convenience. Ganz has said, “I try to give new life to discarded objects.…I get my inspiration from nature and from the movement that we find in nature.” She describes her reuse of the found materials as “3D impressionism”: The recycled objects appear like brush strokes, separated at close proximity but visibly unified at a distance.

A resident of Indiana, Ganz grew up living in Japan, Brazil, and Hong Kong. She holds a master of fine arts degree in sculpture from Bowling Green State University in Ohio. Commissions include a series of four marine life sculptures at the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California. The tour of “Sayaka Ganz: Reclaimed Creations” is produced by David J. Wagner, L.L.C., David J. Wagner, Ph.D., curator and tour director.”

This exhibition is made possible in part by a grant from the Caroline Peine Charitable Foundation/The Manhattan Fund, Bank of America, N.A., Trustee.