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Tag: Kathrine Schlageck

¡El Graficomobile está en Manhattan, Kansas!

The Graficomovil is in Manhattan, Kansas, have you been to check it out in the museum parking lot and make your own print October 3-9, 2017:

Oct. 3-6, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Beach Museum of Art.
Oct. 7, noon-4 p.m., Art in Motion, a free celebration of art, Beach Museum of Art #ArtInMotion
Oct. 8, 1-4 p.m., Oct. 9, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Manhattan Public Library

Graficomovil is a mobile printmaking studio/gallery created by artist Artemio Rodríguez, who is one of the two artists featured in the exhibition Fronteras/Frontiers.
http://beach.k-state.edu/explore/exhibitions/fronteras.html

We would love to see your prints and pictures on our Facebook page. Like and follow the Beach Museum of Art to stay up to date on everything happening at the Beach!

The Martial Adventures of Henry and Me

Thursday, May 11, 5:30 p.m.
The Martial Adventures of Henry and Me

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Senior educator Kathrine Schlageck will give an illustrated talk on the tale of William Allen White and Henry J. Allen visiting the WWI front with the Red Cross.

The Martial Adventures of Henry and Me was written by White and illustrated by Tony Sarg, puppet master, cartoonist, and
author/illustrator.

The museum has received a selection of the original Tony Sarg illustrations.

Reactions to fear of “the other”

Two special exhibitions are allowing us to explore how we react in times of crisis. “Minidoka on My Mind” features images created by Roger Shimomura based on his childhood memories of the Minidoka Japanese American Internment Camp during World War II.  Photographs by Toyo Miyatake in “Behind the Glass Eye” record his experiences in Manzanar.
The experiences of these two artists provide today’s visitors a chance to think about our reactions to fear of “the other,”  something critical for us to be doing when we are facing today’s difficult issues  – from Isis to Black Lives Matter to freedom of speech on college campus.
behing the barbed wire
The above artwork by a middle school student reflects on what she would miss her freedom was taken away.  Below is a photographic montage taken during the open ceremony for the exhibitions by Alan Miyatake, Toyo Miyatake’s grandson which features Guest curators of “Behind the Glass Eye,” Hirokazu Kosaka , a master of Japanese archery, or kyudo, performing an arrow ceremony in honor of all those affected by the Alien Registration Act of 1940.
Toyo wall
This post was written by Kathrine Schlageck, Senior Educator at the Beach Museum of Art.