Prepare Kansas

Category: Build a Kit

Preparing pets for emergencies

Cat with an Emergency KitJune is National Pet Preparedness month. Just as we prepare ourselves and other members of our families for emergencies, if we live with pets, we need to gather emergency supplies and make plans for our pets too. Not sure how to get started? This fact sheet from ready.gov/pets is a great resource.

 

Important basics to include in your pet’s emergency kit are:

  • at least three days of food in an airtight, waterproof container
  • a first aid kit appropriately stocked for your pet’s emergency needs
  • collar with ID tag, harness or leash, and vaccination information
  • favorite toys, treats, and bedding

Watch how Basil the Disaster Kitten gets prepared for a natural disaster in this fun video from the Humane Society of the United States.

Prepare your pet: National Pet Week

Sharing this post from the archives in honor of National Pet Week! In addition to the resources at the links below, the American Veterinary Medical Association shares this resource.

As we plan ahead and prepare for emergencies and natural disasters, it is important to consider all members of our households and that includes our pets. Check out these tips posted recently by Tanika C. Whittington, USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Legislative and Public Affairs, on the USDA blog.

Prepare a pet emergency supply kit with supplies for at least three days. Plan what you will do in an emergency. Stay informed about current or potential emergencies in your area.

NatlPrep_16

Plenty more winter to come!

The temperatures may suggest that spring is around the corner, but don’t be fooled — we still have plenty more days of winter weather ahead. Follow these tips shared by the National Weather Service and be prepared for cold weather.

 

  • Check the Forecast at weather.gov or your favorite weather app, station, etc.: Make checking the forecast part of your regular routine so you’ll know when to expect cold weather.
  • Adjust Your Schedule: If possible, adjust your schedule to avoid being outside during the coldest part of the day, typically the early morning. Try to find a warm spot for your children while waiting for the school bus outside.
  • Protect Your Pets, Livestock and other Property: If you have pets or farm animals, make sure they have plenty of food and water, and are not overly exposed to extreme cold. Take precautions to ensure your water pipes do not freeze. Know the temperature thresholds of your plants and crops.
  • Fill up the tank: Make sure your car or vehicle has at least a half a tank of gas during extreme cold situations so that you can stay warm if you become stranded.
  • Update Your Winter Car Survival Kit.
  • Dress for the outdoors even if you don’t think you’ll be out much: The graphic below shows you how.

Source: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/winter/winter-images/Winter-Dress-Infographic.jpg