Prepare Kansas

#KeepYourCool — Practice #HeatSafety

Heat is one of the leading causes of weather-related fatalities each year. Heat waves have the potential to cover a large area, exposing a high number of people to a hazardous combination of heat and humidity, which can be very taxing on the body. Learn how to stay safe during a heat wave at www.weather.gov/heat

Know the Terms (from https://www.weather.gov/safety/heat-ww)

  • Excessive Heat Warning—Take Action! An Excessive Heat Warning is issued within 12 hours of the onset of extremely dangerous heat conditions. The general rule of thumb for this Warning is when the maximum heat index temperature is expected to be 105° or higher for at least 2 days and night time air temperatures will not drop below 75°; however, these criteria vary across the country, especially for areas not used to extreme heat conditions. If you don’t take precautions immediately when conditions are extreme, you may become seriously ill or even die.
  • Excessive Heat Watches—Be Prepared! Heat watches are issued when conditions are favorable for an excessive heat event in the next 24 to 72 hours. A Watch is used when the risk of a heat wave has increased but its occurrence and timing is still uncertain.
  • Heat Advisory—Take Action! A Heat Advisory is issued within 12 hours of the onset of extremely dangerous heat conditions. The general rule of thumb for this Advisory is when the maximum heat index temperature is expected to be 100° or higher for at least 2 days, and night time air temperatures will not drop below 75°; however, these criteria vary across the country, especially for areas that are not used to dangerous heat conditions. Take precautions to avoid heat illness. If you don’t take precautions, you may become seriously ill or even die.
  • Excessive Heat Outlooks are issued when the potential exists for an excessive heat event in the next 3-7 days. An Outlook provides information to those who need considerable lead-time to prepare for the event.

 

 

 

Flood and Natural Disaster Resources from K-State Research and Extension

Spring 2019. A season likely to be remembered for precipitation, flooding and the constant possibility of severe weather. K-State Research and Extension has curated a group of natural disaster preparedness and response resources from K-State researchers, specialists and extension agents as well as from our colleagues from around the region, including specific tips for dealing with flooding. Access them here.

 

Source: K-State Research and Extension News Media Services Flickr Photostream, https://www.ksre.k-state.edu/news/photography/

#FloodSafety– Know these #Wx Alert Terms

#Floods are the most common natural disaster in the U.S.

Timely info on weather conditions like a flood can make a big difference. Sign up for local alerts & warnings and review the following terms.

A flood watch means “Be Aware” because conditions are right for flooding to occur in your area.

A flood warning means “Take Action!” because flooding is either happening or will happen shortly.

A flash flood warning means flooding is occurring. Seek higher ground immediately. Listen to local officials.

Keep your communication ON when the power’s OFF with a hand-crank radio, solar or car phone charger and batteries.