Prepare Kansas

Helping children respond to natural disasters

Children and adults experience and adjust to disasters in different ways. A recent edition of Sound Living, a public affairs program, hosted by Jeff Wichman,features an interview with Bradford Wiles, assistant professor and Extension specialist. In it they explore how to talk with children after a disaster. Listen to the interview here.

Learn more about the impact disasters, including wildfires, can have on children and the role parents play in helping them recover in this fact sheet.

 

Get prepared: Severe Weather Awareness Week, March 6-10, 2017

The National Weather Service in Topeka encourages all Kansans to participate in a Tornado Drill @ 10am Tuesday March 7.

Everyone is encouraged to participate in the drill by practicing seeking secure, safe shelter from a tornado. This test will be broadcast over NOAA All Hazards Weather Radio and many local television and radio stations. Local officials may also sound their warning sirens. Area residents, businesses, and schools are urged to treat the drill as if it were an actual tornado warning.

Learn more at http://www.weather.gov/top/swaw

 

 

Plenty more winter to come!

The temperatures may suggest that spring is around the corner, but don’t be fooled — we still have plenty more days of winter weather ahead. Follow these tips shared by the National Weather Service and be prepared for cold weather.

 

  • Check the Forecast at weather.gov or your favorite weather app, station, etc.: Make checking the forecast part of your regular routine so you’ll know when to expect cold weather.
  • Adjust Your Schedule: If possible, adjust your schedule to avoid being outside during the coldest part of the day, typically the early morning. Try to find a warm spot for your children while waiting for the school bus outside.
  • Protect Your Pets, Livestock and other Property: If you have pets or farm animals, make sure they have plenty of food and water, and are not overly exposed to extreme cold. Take precautions to ensure your water pipes do not freeze. Know the temperature thresholds of your plants and crops.
  • Fill up the tank: Make sure your car or vehicle has at least a half a tank of gas during extreme cold situations so that you can stay warm if you become stranded.
  • Update Your Winter Car Survival Kit.
  • Dress for the outdoors even if you don’t think you’ll be out much: The graphic below shows you how.

Source: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/winter/winter-images/Winter-Dress-Infographic.jpg