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Large patch activity in research plots

Cool, wet weather has triggered large patch activity in golf courses – and in our research plots.

The photos below are from an ongoing research trial. You can read some details about the study in our online research update from spring. PhD student Mingying Xiang is the lead researcher on this study, under the mentorship of Megan Kennelly and Jack Fry.

The photos below show different zoysiagrass breeding lines. For each plot, one side was inoculated in Sept 2016, and the other side is protected with fungicides to allow ongoing rating of quality and agronomic traits in the absence of disease AND to serve as a “healthy check.”

As you glance through the photos, you can clearly see the large patch on the inoculated sides of many of the plots, while the fungicide-treated side is clean. However, you will also see plots where you can’t even tell which side is which. That is, even the inoculated, non-fungicide-treated side is looking clean. We are hoping those  may be resistant lines to examine in further testing. Stay tuned! Turfgrass breeding takes a long time!

The Kansas Turf Conference is coming up!

The annual Kansas Turfgrass Conference is coming up in about 6-7 weeks. If you have not yet checked out the program you can read it here.

As you’ll see, hot topics include weeds, insects, water, light, diseases, business, and more!

We have a great slate of speakers coming from other states as well. Be sure to register, and we’ll see you in Topeka!

Congratulations to Mingying Xiang for earning national turfgrass science award

KSU PhD student Mingying Xiang is one of this year’s recipients of the prestigious Chris Stiegler Travel Award. She will formally receive the award next week at the annual meeting of the Crop Science Society of America/American Society of Agronomy/Soil Science Society of America.

Congratulations Mingying! She is recognized for her academic achievements in the classroom, research accomplishments, and leadership activities.

Mingying’s research is focused on evaluating zoysiagrass breeding lines for cold hardiness, quality, and resistance to the disease large patch along with studying the potential for tall fescue-zoysiagrass blends to reduce the disease brown patch while maintaining overall summer quality.

 

 

Fall aerification to reduce problems in 2018

Got thatch?

If you are not sure what the thatch situation is on a site you manage, go take a look. Take a trowel, pocket knife, or soil probe, and poke around. If it’s starting to build up in your cool-season turf, take action now. You don’t want a thatch problem to bite you in summer 2018.

Here are some tips in this Fact Sheet about Thatch

Similarly – does your putting green soil look like a layer cake?

As we’ve said before here, a suboptimal rootzone is a pre-existing condition in putting greens.

Take advantage of this great fall weather to do all you can to promote healthy roots in 2018.

Last hiccups of summer diseases

Early last week we saw a couple last gasps of the summer diseases, with some Pythium on a tall fescue lawn:

It was greasy, it was mushy, and after “a night in the box” there was classic Pythium mycelium. Foliar Pythium is rare on tall fescue lawns, usually coming in during very wet weather on sites that have received a little too much water and perhaps a little too much N. When this one came in, it was after one last blast of some heat, but with cool, cool temps on the horizon. Now that we are coming into this nice, consistent cool weather it’s really too late to consider fungicides, and instead we can concentrate on fall renovations AND tweaking cultural practices to help reduce disease risk next year. There was also a last hiccup of brown patch from a golf course fairway. Same story – with lows in the low 60s and even 50s, those diseases should stay quiet and hopefully we won’t see them until 2018.

Next door in Missouri, Dr. Miller is reporting some continued sightings of Pythium root rot (which is different from foliar Pythium) and basal anthracnose. I would agree we are not out of the woods yet. You can see his photos HERE.

Start thinking about large patch applications now if you aren’t already

Photo – large patch symptoms in spring

We humans are enjoying the cool weather, and our cool-season grasses are too. However we are coming up on the time when our warm-season grasses start to shut down, and the season when the large patch pathogen likes to infect our zoysia. Sometimes we see symptoms in fall if conditions are very cool and wet. I have not seen any around here yet, but in Missouri some is firing. Our main time of seeing the symptoms is spring.

In Kansas, applications in September have been quite effective in reducing symptoms through most or all of the following spring. With this early cool weather, leaning towards earlier rather than later in the month may be wise. Next door in Missouri they’ve seen good results with EARLY spring applications as well – read about it HERE in Dr. Miller’s excellent post about application timing.  In Kansas, when we’ve tried mid/late spring applications when symptoms are already pretty apparent, they don’t work well, if at all. For details on the newest products you can check the large patch section here (click to page 18)

http://www2.ca.uky.edu/agcomm/pubs/ppa/ppa1/ppa1.pdf

 

Here is a video with some descriptions of the biology and symptoms:

 

A couple blasts from the past! Seed selection and power raking/core aerification

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

After finding the article on grey leaf spot I found a couple more articles that I wanted to repost due to the time of the year it is.

One is on determining if you need are going to conduct power raking or core aeration this fall?

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/power-raking-or-core-aeration-that-is-the-question/

The others were on selecting the right grass seed!

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/for-seeding-success-pay-attention-to-other-crop-on-the-seed-label/

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/the-art-of-knowing-your-seed-label/

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Grey Leaf Spot – All the way from 2015.

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Someone told me and I am not sure if it is correct or not, “that grey leaf spot will infect crabgrass before it hits our desirable turfgrass species”.  The other day I saw some grey leaf spot crabgrass in a ryegrass lawn and got me thinking that this is about the time grey leaf spot starts to kick in around here.  I went back through the blogs and back in 2015 (Actually August 25, 2015) I posted about grey leaf spot.

I wanted to pass along the blog again for everyone that may have had grey leaf spot in the past.

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/grey-leaf-spot/

Also check on  more control options for grey leaf spot in this publication – http://www2.ca.uky.edu/agc/pubs/ppa/ppa1/ppa1.pdf

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

New Turfgrass Extension Publications Now Online!!!!

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

I have been busy this past year updating the KSU Turfgrass Research Extension Publications.  With the help of everyone at the K-State Research and Extension Bookstore we updated a total of 7.

I wanted to share these with you so you have them to read and to share with your friends and neighbors.

Benefits of a Healthy Lawn – Environmental, economic, health, and safety benefits of turfgrass found in lawns, athletic fields, parks, and roadsides.

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=12800

Turfgrass Selection – Professional Series – Information to help turfgrass managers select grasses appropriate for a particular environment.

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=645

Turfgrass Identification – Professional Series – Information for turfgrass managers to help identify grasses by their vegetative characteristics

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=644

Lawn Fertilizing Guide – This guide helps homeowners determine how much fertilizer to apply to keep lawn vigorous and healthy.

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=10639

Turfgrass Mowing – Professional Series – Mowing basics for professional turfgrass managers. Information on mowing height and frequency, clippings, mowing pattern, mower operation, blade sharpening, mower selection, maintenance, and safety.

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=712

Recycling Grass Clippings – Information for homeowners on why and how to recycle grass clippings.

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=701

Mowing Your Lawn – Mowing basics for homeowners. Includes information on mowing height and frequency, pattern, mower operation, maintenance, and safety

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=615

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf