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Fall aerification to reduce problems in 2018

Got thatch?

If you are not sure what the thatch situation is on a site you manage, go take a look. Take a trowel, pocket knife, or soil probe, and poke around. If it’s starting to build up in your cool-season turf, take action now. You don’t want a thatch problem to bite you in summer 2018.

Here are some tips in this Fact Sheet about Thatch

Similarly – does your putting green soil look like a layer cake?

As we’ve said before here, a suboptimal rootzone is a pre-existing condition in putting greens.

Take advantage of this great fall weather to do all you can to promote healthy roots in 2018.

Last hiccups of summer diseases

Early last week we saw a couple last gasps of the summer diseases, with some Pythium on a tall fescue lawn:

It was greasy, it was mushy, and after “a night in the box” there was classic Pythium mycelium. Foliar Pythium is rare on tall fescue lawns, usually coming in during very wet weather on sites that have received a little too much water and perhaps a little too much N. When this one came in, it was after one last blast of some heat, but with cool, cool temps on the horizon. Now that we are coming into this nice, consistent cool weather it’s really too late to consider fungicides, and instead we can concentrate on fall renovations AND tweaking cultural practices to help reduce disease risk next year. There was also a last hiccup of brown patch from a golf course fairway. Same story – with lows in the low 60s and even 50s, those diseases should stay quiet and hopefully we won’t see them until 2018.

Next door in Missouri, Dr. Miller is reporting some continued sightings of Pythium root rot (which is different from foliar Pythium) and basal anthracnose. I would agree we are not out of the woods yet. You can see his photos HERE.

Start thinking about large patch applications now if you aren’t already

Photo – large patch symptoms in spring

We humans are enjoying the cool weather, and our cool-season grasses are too. However we are coming up on the time when our warm-season grasses start to shut down, and the season when the large patch pathogen likes to infect our zoysia. Sometimes we see symptoms in fall if conditions are very cool and wet. I have not seen any around here yet, but in Missouri some is firing. Our main time of seeing the symptoms is spring.

In Kansas, applications in September have been quite effective in reducing symptoms through most or all of the following spring. With this early cool weather, leaning towards earlier rather than later in the month may be wise. Next door in Missouri they’ve seen good results with EARLY spring applications as well – read about it HERE in Dr. Miller’s excellent post about application timing.  In Kansas, when we’ve tried mid/late spring applications when symptoms are already pretty apparent, they don’t work well, if at all. For details on the newest products you can check the large patch section here (click to page 18)

http://www2.ca.uky.edu/agcomm/pubs/ppa/ppa1/ppa1.pdf

 

Here is a video with some descriptions of the biology and symptoms:

 

A couple blasts from the past! Seed selection and power raking/core aerification

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

After finding the article on grey leaf spot I found a couple more articles that I wanted to repost due to the time of the year it is.

One is on determining if you need are going to conduct power raking or core aeration this fall?

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/power-raking-or-core-aeration-that-is-the-question/

The others were on selecting the right grass seed!

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/for-seeding-success-pay-attention-to-other-crop-on-the-seed-label/

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/the-art-of-knowing-your-seed-label/

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Grey Leaf Spot – All the way from 2015.

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Someone told me and I am not sure if it is correct or not, “that grey leaf spot will infect crabgrass before it hits our desirable turfgrass species”.  The other day I saw some grey leaf spot crabgrass in a ryegrass lawn and got me thinking that this is about the time grey leaf spot starts to kick in around here.  I went back through the blogs and back in 2015 (Actually August 25, 2015) I posted about grey leaf spot.

I wanted to pass along the blog again for everyone that may have had grey leaf spot in the past.

http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/grey-leaf-spot/

Also check on  more control options for grey leaf spot in this publication – http://www2.ca.uky.edu/agc/pubs/ppa/ppa1/ppa1.pdf

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

New Turfgrass Extension Publications Now Online!!!!

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

I have been busy this past year updating the KSU Turfgrass Research Extension Publications.  With the help of everyone at the K-State Research and Extension Bookstore we updated a total of 7.

I wanted to share these with you so you have them to read and to share with your friends and neighbors.

Benefits of a Healthy Lawn – Environmental, economic, health, and safety benefits of turfgrass found in lawns, athletic fields, parks, and roadsides.

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=12800

Turfgrass Selection – Professional Series – Information to help turfgrass managers select grasses appropriate for a particular environment.

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=645

Turfgrass Identification – Professional Series – Information for turfgrass managers to help identify grasses by their vegetative characteristics

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=644

Lawn Fertilizing Guide – This guide helps homeowners determine how much fertilizer to apply to keep lawn vigorous and healthy.

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=10639

Turfgrass Mowing – Professional Series – Mowing basics for professional turfgrass managers. Information on mowing height and frequency, clippings, mowing pattern, mower operation, blade sharpening, mower selection, maintenance, and safety.

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=712

Recycling Grass Clippings – Information for homeowners on why and how to recycle grass clippings.

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=701

Mowing Your Lawn – Mowing basics for homeowners. Includes information on mowing height and frequency, pattern, mower operation, maintenance, and safety

https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=615

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

The 2017 Turfgrass Research Reports Now Online!

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

The 2017 Turfgrass Research Reports are now available!!!! See what research projects the KSU Turfgrass Team have been up to.

Click the link below to take you to the Kansas Agriculture Experiment Station Research Report Page.

http://newprairiepress.org/kaesrr/vol3/iss4/

Volume 3, Issue 4 (2017) Turfgrass Research

Research Reports

PDF

Measurement of Evapotranspiration in Turfgrass: Recommended Techniques and Adjustment Coefficients
Kenton W. Peterson, D. Bremer, Kira B. Shonkwiler, and J. M. Ham

PDF

Evaluating Zoysiagrass-Tall Fescue Mixtures in Kansas
Mingying Xiang, J. Fry, and M. Kennelly

PDF

2012 National Turfgrass Evaluation Program Tall Fescue Test: 2016 Data
L. Parsons, Michael J. Shelton, M. Kennelly, J. Griffin, and J. Hoyle

PDF

2013 National Turfgrass Evaluation Program Bermudagrass Test: 2016 Data
L. Parsons, Michael J. Shelton, J. Griffin, and J. Hoyle

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Time to fertilize cool-season turfgrass

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

September is almost here and that means it is prime time for to fertilize your tall fescue or Kentucky bluegrass lawns. If you could only fertilize your cool-season grasses once per year, this would be the best time to do it.

These grasses are entering their fall growth cycle as days shorten and temperatures moderate (especially at night). Cool-season grasses naturally thicken up in the fall by tillering (forming new shoots at the base of existing plants) and, for bluegrass, spreading by underground stems called rhizomes. Consequently, September is the most important time to fertilize these grasses.

Apply 1 to 1.5 pounds of actual nitrogen per 1,000 square feet. The settings recommended on lawn fertilizer bags usually result in about 1 pound of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet. We recommend a quick-release source of nitrogen at this time. Most fertilizers sold in garden centers and department stores contain either quick-release nitrogen or a mixture of quick- and slow-release. (We will talk about slow release in a later article.)

The second most important fertilization of cool-season grasses also occurs during the fall. A November fertilizer application will help the grass green up earlier next spring and provide the nutrients needed until summer. It also should be quick-release applied at the rate of 1-pound actual nitrogen per 1,000 square feet.

So total you only want to use up to 3 lbs of actually nitrogen per 1,000 square feet over September, October and November.

Here are some different ways you can apply the quick release nitrogen source;

Method 1 (Totaling 3 lbs of actually nitrogen per 1,000 square feet)

  • September – 1 lbs of actual N/1,000 square feet
  • October – 1 lbs of actual N/1,000 square feet
  • November – 1 lbs of actual N/1,000 square feet

Method 2 (Totaling 3 lbs of actually nitrogen per 1,000 square feet)

  • September – 1.5 lbs of actual N/1,000 square feet
  • November – 1.5 lbs of actual N/1,000 square feet

Method 3 (Totaling 2 lbs of actually nitrogen per 1,000 square feet)

  • September – 1 lbs of actual N/1,000 square feet
  • November – 1 lbs of actual N/1,000 square feet

Click here for the Kansas Lawn Fertilizing Guide – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=10639

Always make sure your pride your fertilizer evenly!!!!  You don’t want this to happen.

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Monthly calendar for cool-season lawns for the rest of 2017.

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

I can’t believe it… Where has the summer gone?  I blinked and students are running around campus and just last night it was cool enough to cut the A/C off and open the windows.  Not to mention just in a couple weeks we will be watching college football.

When all of this happens I know I need to be getting out and working on my cool-season lawn.  Time for fertilizer, overseeding existing lawns and establishing new lawns.  So first I want to go back and look at the lawn calendar for cool-season lawns.  Here are some recommendations.

Late-July through August
If you see grub damage, apply a grub killer that contains Dylox. Imidacloprid is effective against young grubs and may not be effective on late instar grubs. The grub killer containing Dylox must be watered in within 24 hours or effectiveness drops.

September
Fertilize around Labor Day. This is the most important fertilization of the year. Water in the fertilizer.

November
Fertilize. This fertilizer is taken up by the roots but is not used until the following spring. Water in fertilizer. Spray for broadleaf weeds even if they are small. Broadleaf weeds are much easier to control in the fall than in the spring. Spray on a day that is at least 50 degrees. Rain or irrigate within 24 hours reduces effectiveness. Use label rates for all products!

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

K-State Radio Network – Overseeding Cool-Season Lawns

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

For this week’s horticulture segment, K-State turfgrass specialist Jared Hoyle talks about taking the preliminary steps now for overseeding a cool-season lawn this fall.

Click the link below for K-State Research and Extension Agriculture Today Radio Program hosted by Eric Atkinson.