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Developing a Weed Control Program

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

There are many important factors to consider when you are developing a weed control program.  Here is a list of information you should have to help you develop your program.

  1. Turfgrass species
  2. Area needing to be treated.
  3. Correct identification of the problematic weeds.
  4. The time of year the weeds are present.
  5. Determine why the weeds are invading and correct the conditions or cultural practice that are leading to the weed invasion.
  6. Select a chemical that is effective and label for control of the weeds you are treating.
  7. Follow all label instructions!!!!!!!
  8. Apply at the correct time and rate.
  9. Apply herbicides evenly.
  10. Follow up with repeat applications if recommended on the label.

This is also great information to have if you can’t figure out why a weed control method didn’t work.  For more information on diagnosing why a weed control method didn’t work, click here – https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/i-sprayed-but-i-didnt-kill-the-weed/

Information in this article is from Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals.

Patton, A.J., M. Elmore, J. Hoyle, J. Kao-Kniffin, B. Branham, T. Voigt, N. Christians, A. Thoms, G. Munshaw, A. Hathaway, T. Nikolai, B. Horgan, L. Miller, X. Xiong, W. Kreuser, R. Gaussoin, D. Gardner, Z. Raudenbush, D. Li, P. Landschoot, D. Soldat, and P. Koch. 2019 Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals. Purdue University Extension Publication. TURF-100. pp. 128.

Get your copy here – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=20239

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Research UPDATE – Influence of Herbicide Combinations and Sequential Applications on Windmillgrass (Chloris verticillata) Control

(By Nic Mitchell and Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Windmillgrass (Chloris verticillata Nutt.) populations commonly infest turfgrass systems in the mid-west, which result in aesthetically unacceptable turfgrass stands. Windmillgrass is a perennial monocot bunch-type grass. It often spreads by stolons and by its panicle shape seed which acts much like tumble weed.

Prior research found that Pylex (topramezone) and Acclaim Extra (fenoxaprop) result in fair to minimal control of windmillgrass with a single application. Tenacity (mesotrione) which, labeled for two applications for best control of windmillgrass, recommends the second application should be three weeks after initial application. Additionally, studies have shown the addition of triclopyr to HPPD inhibitor herbicides increases windmillgrass control in a controlled environment.

The goal of this research was to determine the effect of a sequential postemergent herbicide applications and the addition of triclopyr to HPPD inhibitors herbicides on windmillgrass control.

Research trials were initiated in 2018 at Rocky Ford Turfgrass Research Center in Manhattan, Kansas. Windmillgrass was infested in a low maintenance tall fescue (Schedonorus arundinaceus) system. Seven herbicide combinations were applied as a single application or with a sequential application and non-treated control was included for comparison for a total of 15 individual treatments. All herbicide treatments were applied on August 16, 2018 and treatments that received a sequential application were applied on September 9, 2018. Herbicide treatments consisted of Pylex (topramezone) at 2 fl oz/a, Tenacity (mesotrione) at 8 fl oz/a, Acclaim (fenoxaprop) at 39 fl oz/a, Alligare Triclopyr 4 (triclopyr) at 32 fl oz/a, Pylex (topramezone) at 2 fl oz/a + Alligare Triclopyr 4 (triclopyr) at 32 fl oz/a, Tenacity (mesotrione) at 8 fl oz/a + Alligare Triclopyr 4 (triclopyr) at 32 fl oz/a, Acclaim (fenoxaprop) at 39 fl oz/a + Alligare Triclopyr 4 (triclopyr) at 32 fl oz/a, and a nontreated control. Data collection consisted of visual percent windmillgrass cover (0-100%) and were transformed to percent windmillgrass control for presentation purposes. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed in SAS 9.4 (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) and means were separated according to Fisher’s protected least significant difference (LSD) level at 0.05.

We found that Pylex (topramezone) applied at 2 fl oz/a resulted in 87% windmillgrass control at 8 weeks after treatment. A single application of Pylex (topramezone) at 2 fl oz/a + Alligare Triclopyr 4 (triclopyr) at 32 fl oz/a and Tenacity (mesotrione) at 8 fl oz/a + Alligare Triclopyr 4 (triclopyr) at 32 fl oz/a resulted in 96% and 97% windmillgrass control 8 weeks after initial treatment, respectively. All treatments that received a sequential application on September 9, 2018 excluding the non-treated control and Acclaim (fenoxaprop) at 39 fl oz/a provided 100% windmillgrass control at 8 WAT. Acclaim (fenoxaprop) at 39 fl oz/a applied on August 16, 2018 followed by an application at 39 fl oz/a on September 9, 2018 resulted in 88% windmillgrass control.

Table 1. Windmillgrass (Chloris verticillata Nutt.) control 8 weeks after initial application from single and sequential applications at Rocky Ford Turfgrass Research Center in Manhattan, KS; 2018.

Treatment Herbicide Rate Application Date Controla
___%___
1 non-treatedb 4 Cc
2 Pylex + MSOd 2 fl oz/a + 1% v/v Aug. 16, 2018 87 A
3 Tenacity + NISd 8 fl oz/a + 0.25% v/v Aug. 16, 2018 9 C
4 Acclaim Extra + NIS 39 fl oz/a + 32 fl oz/100 gal Aug. 16, 2018 16 C
5 Triclopyr 32 fl oz/a Aug. 16, 2018 64 B
6 Pylex + Triclopyr + MSO 2 fl oz/a + 32 fl oz/a + 1% v/v Aug. 16, 2018 96 A
7 Tenacity + Triclopyr +NIS 8 fl oz/a + 32 fl oz/a + 0.25% v/v Aug. 16, 2018 97 A
8 Acclaim Extra + Triclopyr +NIS 39 fl oz/a + 32 fl oz/a + 32 fl oz/100 gal Aug. 16, 2018 63 B
9 Pylex + MSO 2 fl oz/a + 1% v/v Aug. 16, 2018 fbe Sept. 9, 2018 100 A
10 Tenacity + NIS 8 fl oz/a + 0.25% v/v Aug. 16, 2018 fb Sept. 9, 2018 100 A
11 Acclaim Extra + NIS 39 fl oz/a + 32 fl oz/100 gal Aug. 16, 2018 fb Sept. 9, 2018 88 A
12 Triclopyr 32 fl oz/a Aug. 16, 2018 fb Sept. 9, 2018 100 A
13 Pylex + Triclopyr + MSO 2 fl oz/a + 32 fl oz/a + 1% v/v Aug. 16, 2018 fb Sept. 9, 2018 100 A
14 Tenacity + Triclopyr +NIS 8 fl oz/a + 32 fl oz/a + 0.25% v/v Aug. 16, 2018 fb Sept. 9, 2018 100 A
15 Acclaim Extra + Triclopyr +NIS 39 fl oz/a + 32 fl oz/a + 32 fl oz/100 gal Aug. 16, 2018 fb Sept. 9, 2018 100 A

a Ratings were conducted 8 weeks after initial application; October 11, 2018.

b Non-treated control contained approximately 65% windmillgrass cover throughout the research trial. 4% control was observed due natural declining of windmillgrass populations to environmental considerations on October 11, 2018.

c Treatment means followed by a common capital letter are not significantly different according to Fisher’s protected LSD (α= 0.05).

d MSO, methylated seed oil and NIS, non-ionic surfactant were added to treatments according to herbicide manufacture recommendations.

e fb, followed by.


Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

NEW – Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals – 2019

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

With new herbicides entering the market, new techniques for controlling weeds, and with more and more difficult to control weeds the “Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals” manual has been updated to address many of these issues.  Check out the 2019 edition!  It is a must have for every turfgrass manager!

To get your copy click here – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=20239

 

Yellow Nutsedge Control

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

As I talk to turfgrass professionals across the state I hear that some are getting plenty of rain while others are getting none. This time of the year we think that if we are getting some precipitation we will have yellow nutsedge popping up everywhere. Well that is not always true. Yellow nutsedge does favor moist soils but it can also grow in well-drained sites.

One of the easiest ways to identify yellow nutsedge is by a couple special features;

  • erect
  • persistant
  • yellow inflorescence
  • gradually tapering leaves to a sharp point
  • tubers not in chains
  • triangular stem

To control yellow nutsedge, if you can get applications out before tuber production then you will see increased control.  But beware, yellow nutsedge will continue to grow as long as the environment is favorable for growth, so more than one application maybe necessary.

If using a herbicide application timing is critical.  During mid summer yellow nutsedge starts making tubers and if you apply herbicides before tuber production you will get better control.  If you wait until the yellow nutsedge is big and starting to make tubers then you will be playing catch-up all year. So sooner is better.  Don’t wait for it to get too big.

Here are some options for yellow nutsedge control for turfgrass professionals;

  • sulfentrazone
  • halosulfuron
  • iodosulfuron
  • mesotrione
  • bentazon
  • triflozysulfuron
  • flazasulfuron
  • sulfosulfuron

There are many different products out there that contain these active ingredients so just make sure you have an active ingredient that has yellow nutsedge control! Also make sure you check for turfgrass tolerances.

****Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application.****

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Return of the Goathead – Puncturevine

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Return of the Goathead – Sounds like a horror movie! Well, right now I do feel like it is “Return of the Goathead”. Just about everywhere I look I see a goathead. Goathead is also known as puncturevine (Tribulus terrestris). It is a summer annual broadleaf weed that can cause headaches for many people.

 

This weed is a prostrate mat-forming weed that can produce many burs with sharp spines. This weed if invading a lawn, athletic field, playground and parks can cause injury to children and animals if they fall on or step on the sharp spines. It can also be found in disturbed areas as fields, pastures and roadsides. Good news is that many of the broadleaf herbicides are effective.

 

****Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application.****

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Guess what KS city is listed as #7 in the Top 10 Worst Cities for Weeds and Disease for 2018?

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

As I was looking through some news articles I came across this one that caught my eye.

 “Top 10 Worst Cities for Weeds and Disease in 2018”

I couldn’t wait to click the article and see what the National Association of Landscape Professionals listed as the top 10 worst cities for weeds and disease.  It was also pretty interesting how they came up with these cities.  Check it out!

Guess what KS city is listed as #7?

http://www.kltv.com/story/37912381/weed-watch-the-top-10-worst-cities-for-weeds-and-lawn-disease-in-2018

 

Homeowner Do-It-Yourself Lawn Calendar Reminders!

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Earlier this year I wrote two blog posts that listed out both a cool- and warm-season lawn calendar for homeowners.  If you are anything like me then I have already forgot what I was suppose to do so sometimes it is good to have a reminder.

Cool-season Lawn Calendar Reminder 

June through Mid-July
Apply second round of crabgrass preventer by June 15 – unless you have used Dimension (dithiopyr) or Barricade (prodiamine) for the April application. These two products normally provide season-long control with a single application. Remember to water it in. If grubs have been a problem in the past, apply a product containing imidacloprid during the first half of July. This works to prevent grub damage. It must be watered in before it becomes active.

Warm-season Lawn Calendar Reminder

May – August 15
Fertilize with 1 lb. of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet per application. Follow the recommendations on the bag. More applications will give a deeper green color, but will increase mowing and may lead to thatch buildup with zoysiagrass. Bermudagrass can also have problems with thatch buildup but thatch is less likely with Bermuda than zoysia. Bermudagrass – Use two to four applications. Zoysiagrass – Use one to two applications. Too much nitrogen leads to thatch buildup.

One Application: Apply in June.
Two Applications: Apply May and July.
Three Applications: Apply May, June, and early August.
Four Applications: Apply May, June, July, and early August.

Remember to look and see if you are using a quick release nitrogen source or a slow release nitrogen source.  If you use a quick release source then it is immediately available but only lasts a couple weeks.  Thats why you would have to make a couple of applications like it is listed above.  If you are going to use a slow release source it will tell you on the bag how long the product will last.  Therefore, you might not have to make as many applications.

So generally you want to use a total of 2 to 4lb. of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet per year for bermudagrass and 1 to 2 lb. of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet per year for zoysiagrass.

Buffalograss – Fertilize with 1 lb. of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet during June. More applications will give a deeper green color. If it is felt that a second application is needed, apply in July. Do not exceed more than 2 lbs of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet per YEAR for a home lawn.

June
If grubs have been a problem in the past, apply a product containing imidacloprid by mid July. Imidacloprid can be applied as early as mid May if there are problems with billbugs or May beetle grubs. These products kill the grubs before they cause damage. They are effective and safe but must be watered in before they become active.

June is also a good time to core aerate a warm-season lawn. Core aeration will help alleviate compaction, increase the rate of water infiltration, improve soil air exchange and help control thatch.

For the full Do-It-yourself Lawn Calendars click the links below

Warm-Season – http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/homeowner-do-it-yourself-lawn-calendar-for-warm-season-grass/ 

Cool-Season – http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/homeowner-do-it-yourself-lawn-calendar-for-cool-season-grasses/

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Knotweed – Last year it was April, Now its February!

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Last year I did one of my first Turfgrass Selfie Series on knotweed control in April.  The knotweed had germinated and started to mature.  Just a couple weeks ago I was walking into my office and I saw knotweed already germinating.  (See picture below – Photo taken Feb. 22, 2017)

So needless to say.  If you didn’t get your preemerge out and you have a history of knotweed it is time to go out and attack the knotweed and other broadleaf weeds you have lingering around.  These weeds are easier to control now when they are young compared to when they get mature.

Below is the Knotweed Control Turfgrass Selfie Series Video I did last year but here are the take home messages;

  • Early germinating summer annual
  • Likes compacted soils/flooded areas
  • 2,4-D = fair control
  • 2,4-D + triclopyr or dicamba = excellent control
  • metsulfuron can be used in warm-season turf
  • PRE applications must be done in the Fall

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

New Weed Control Publication For Turfgrass Professionals

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

In 2016 Dr. Aaron Patton and Daniel Weisenberger reached out to surrounding universities to collaborate on producing a multi-state Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals Publication.  There are 11 states, including Kansas, that worked together to help produce the 2017 edition.

 

Guide provides weed identification and control information that turfgrass professionals can use to develop effective weed control programs for golf courses, athletic fields, sod farms, lawns, and other turfgrass systems. Recommendations apply to most states, with input from experts in IL, IN, IA, Kansas, KY, MI, MN, MO, NE, NY, OH, and WI.

It contains images and information for identifying 105 different weed species.

 

 

Covers herbicide selection in:

  • Nonselective herbicide/fumigants for renovation
  • Nonselective herbicides for border maintenance
  • Preemergence herbicides
  • Postemergence broadleaf herbicides
  • Postemergence grass herbicides
  • Postemergence sedge herbicides
  • PGRs for general turf
  • PGRs for putting greens
  • Herbicides labeled for putting greens (PRE and POST)

The publicationl also covers many other weed control aspects like;

  • Which herbicide works best for each weed.
  • Includes notes and comments on each herbicide.
  • Control of tough weeds.
  • Provides handy comparisons of broadleaf herbicide ingredients.
  • Covers fundamentals of how herbicides work
  • frequently asked questions.

GET YOURS TODAY! 

For an electronic download copy for 12.00 click here – https://mdc.itap.purdue.edu/item.asp?item_number=Turf-100-W#.WMFVKGVuD8s

For a hard copy delivered to your door (20.00) click here – https://mdc.itap.purdue.edu/item.asp?item_number=TURF-100#.WMFVDWVuD8u

Turfgrass Selfie Series #2 [VIDEO] – Wild Violet Control

(By Jared Hoyle; KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

“We have hit the mother load!”  Behind Throckmorton Hall I ran into the largest patch of Wild Violet I have ever seen so we decided that would be a good Turfgrass Selfie Series Video. Enjoy!

IMG_0750Also, we tried to work out some of the kinks from the first episode but still have a ways to go to get all the kinks out. The goal of this video series is to use our phones and to make short videos without too much editing and taking too much time but to deliver insightful information. With that being said we can’t cover everything in the short video but at least it gets the basic information out there.

So for the second Turfgrass Selfie Series we bring you wild violet control… “We have hit the mother load!”

For more information go to www.ksu.edu/turf