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Tag: weed control

I sprayed but I didn’t kill the weed!

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

“I sprayed but I didn’t kill the weed!” I get this comment many times throughout the year and there could be may possible reasons why, other than saying that herbicide doesn’t work. What I have found is that the most common reason is human error. So, here are a couple questions you should ask yourself to help determine what went wrong.

  1. Did you correctly identify the weed?
  2. Was the weed listed on the label?
  3. Did you use the correct rate?
  4. Did you have uniform spray coverage?
  5. Did you apply it at the appropriate growth stage?
  6. What was the temperature when you applied? Was it within the label recommendation?
  7. Was there adequate soil moisture for weed growth?
  8. Did you tank-mix?  Could have an antagonistic effect!
  9. Where you suppose to make two applications (according to the label)?
  10. Did it rain or did the irrigation run soon after application?
  11. Did you add an adjuvant or surfactant that was recommended on the label?
  12. If you applied a PRE, did you water it in, within the next few days? or has the weed already germinated or emerged?

These are just a couple questions used to help figured out what happened if you sprayed and didn’t kill the weed.

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Postemergent Crabgrass Control

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Today I was walking around the Rocky Ford Turfgrass Research Center in Manhattan, KS looking for an area to put out a postemergent crabgrass study and notice that the crabgrass on the research farm is all different stages.  It is important to know what stage the crabgrass is in to help with control.  That could determine your success in controlling it with postemergent herbicides

There are postemergent herbicide options out there for crabgrass control.  But depending on how big or how many tillers the crabgrass has will help you determine what product to use.  First, determine the size or stage of crabgrass you have present.

Here is a picture to show the tillering stages of crabgrass.

The smaller the crabgrass the easier it is to kill it.  The tillered crabgrass may take more than one application and higher rates so make sure you check the label for correct application rates and intervals.

  • dithopyr – Can provide control to crabgrass up to one tiller stage.  This product also has preemergence activity.
  • quinclorac – Can be applied on most cool- and warm-season turfgrass species.  This product controls crabgrass when it is one tiller or smaller or when it has four or more tillers.
  • mesotrione – Can be effective for crabgrass control but in most cases will take two applications at two week intervals. The label also states that applications must be made before the four tiller crabgrass stage.
  • topramazone – Similar to mesotrione, this product will require two applications at three week intervals. Use at higher rates on crabgrass that have greater than one tiller.
  • fenoxaprop – Are very effective in controlling crabgrass.  Label states that this product can be applied to annual grasses up to the five tiller stage. Remember not to tank mix with products that contain 2,4-D, antagonism can occur.

As one last reminder, do not apply post emergent herbicides outside the recommended temperature on the label.  This will increase the risk of turfgrass injury.

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

NEW – Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals – 2019

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

With new herbicides entering the market, new techniques for controlling weeds, and with more and more difficult to control weeds the “Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals” manual has been updated to address many of these issues.  Check out the 2019 edition!  It is a must have for every turfgrass manager!

To get your copy click here – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=20239

 

White Clover Control

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

School is starting back and college football is right around the corner.  This tells me it is the best time of the year to start renovating, overseeding or establishing new cool-season turfgrass areas. But before you do that, you might have some unwanted weeds to get rid of.  White clover is one of the most common weeds found in cool-season turfgrass.  It can grow in a wide range of environmental conditions and can tolerate many of our cultural practices.   It can also spread by seeds and by stolons.

White clover is a perennial broadleaf weed that has trifoliate leaves that may or may not have a wedged-shaped mark. Although it is called white clover the flowers are white but may turn pink as they age.

Because white clover can fix its own nitrogen some see it as an important species to add beneficial soil nitrogen.  There had been some work done to explore using both clover and turfgrass in a mixture in their lawns.  Others may consider it as a weed.

If you consider it a weed, fall is a great time to try and control it.  But did you know 2,4-D, glyphosate and sulfentrazone do not control white clover?  For best control herbicides that contain clopyralid, dicamba, fluroxypyr, florasulam, metsulfruon, and/or quinclorac (also controls crabgrass) provide the best control when applied in the fall.

Always remember a healthy turfgrass stand through proper maintenance is the best weed control and can help minimize clover in you turfgrass.

Information from this post if from “Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals” To get your copy today click here – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=20239

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Yellow Nutsedge Control

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

As I talk to turfgrass professionals across the state I hear that some are getting plenty of rain while others are getting none. This time of the year we think that if we are getting some precipitation we will have yellow nutsedge popping up everywhere. Well that is not always true. Yellow nutsedge does favor moist soils but it can also grow in well-drained sites.

One of the easiest ways to identify yellow nutsedge is by a couple special features;

  • erect
  • persistant
  • yellow inflorescence
  • gradually tapering leaves to a sharp point
  • tubers not in chains
  • triangular stem

To control yellow nutsedge, if you can get applications out before tuber production then you will see increased control.  But beware, yellow nutsedge will continue to grow as long as the environment is favorable for growth, so more than one application maybe necessary.

If using a herbicide application timing is critical.  During mid summer yellow nutsedge starts making tubers and if you apply herbicides before tuber production you will get better control.  If you wait until the yellow nutsedge is big and starting to make tubers then you will be playing catch-up all year. So sooner is better.  Don’t wait for it to get too big.

Here are some options for yellow nutsedge control for turfgrass professionals;

  • sulfentrazone
  • halosulfuron
  • iodosulfuron
  • mesotrione
  • bentazon
  • triflozysulfuron
  • flazasulfuron
  • sulfosulfuron

There are many different products out there that contain these active ingredients so just make sure you have an active ingredient that has yellow nutsedge control! Also make sure you check for turfgrass tolerances.

****Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application.****

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Stinks… Don’t It! – Wild Garlic Control In Turfgrass

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Garlic has a very distinct and pungent smell, stinks… don’t it!  But did you know there are benefits to eating garlic? It is highly nutritious but has very few low calories, it can help combat sickness, it can reduce blood pressure, and more.

Around Manhattan I have been seeing a lot of wild garlic in lawns. Now don’t go out and eat that wild garlic. We are now talking about the turfgrass weed wild garlic and not the garlic you eat.

Wild garlic (Allium vineale) is more obvious in the winter and early spring because this weed will grow above the turfgrass canopy and is easily noticed. Sometimes it can be easily confused with wild onion and star-of-Bethlehem.

Wild garlic is a perennial bulb that has a grass like appliance. It emerges in late winter and early spring. The leaves are straight and smooth. The way to tell the difference between wild garlic wild onion is by tearing the stem to see if it is hollow or solid. It if is hollow then it is wild garlic. If it is a solid stem then it could be wild onion.

This weed tolerate a wide range of soil conditions but I have noticed it more in low maintenance areas.

Photo credit – Auburn University Turfgrass – http://cses.auburn.edu/turfgrass-management/weed-identification/wild-garlic/

Control of wild garlic in cool-season turfgrass is more difficult then in warm-season turfgrasses.  For fair control use 2,4-D or one of the many combinations of 2,4-D, MCPP and dicamba.  This products have shown to have limited control.  The ester formulations of 2,4-D are more effective than amine formulations.  Applications in the late fall and early spring when there is adequate foliage is best.  To increase uptake, mowing before application may help.

In warm-season turfgrass metsulfuron or metsulfuron + sulfentrazone and sulfosulfuron provide very effective control.  Applying these products in late March early April on a warm day above 50 deg F when there is good soil moisture will increase efficacy.

If you got wild garlic, right now is the time to go out and get it.  Not to mention if you have any other broadleaf weeds you will get some control of those as well!

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

Not Your Father’s Knotweed

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

For the past couple years I have posted on prostrate knotweed (Polygonum aviculare) control in turfgrass systems.  Guess what… it is that time of year again.  I have been seeing knotweed germinate all across campus and in areas where turf is thin.  Knotweed can grow in compacted soils where turf can’t survive. So after you get control of that knotweed make sure you aerify to relieve the compaction (Check out my recent post on aerification – http://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/new-aerating-your-lawn-ksre-publication/) and get some healthy turfgrass growing.

There are going to be some new products coming to the market soon that we have tested on prostrate knotweed that have shown excellent control.  So keep a lookout for new broadleaf herbicides (Hopefully they will be out either late this year or early next year).  When they hit the market you will hear all about it and next year when I post about knotweed control hopefully they will be released and I can add it to the list!

If you didn’t get your preemerge out in the fall for control and you have a history of knotweed it is time to go out and attack the knotweed and other broadleaf weeds you have lingering around.  These weeds are easier to control now when they are young compared to when they get mature.

Below is the Knotweed Control Turfgrass Selfie Series Video I did last year but here are the take home messages;

  • Early germinating summer annual
  • Likes compacted soils/flooded areas
  • 2,4-D = fair control
  • 2,4-D + triclopyr or dicamba = excellent control
  • metsulfuron can be used in warm-season turf
  • PRE applications must be done in the Fall

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

 

A Homeowner Step-By-Step Buffalograss Lawn Guide

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Buffalograss Lawn Calendar

For more information check out the Buffalograss Lawns Publication at the KSRE Bookstore – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=1447

Buffalograss has become more popular in recent years due to its reputation as a low-maintenance grass. Buffalograss does require less water and fertilizer than our other turfgrasses but often has problems competing with weeds in eastern Kansas. Remember, buffalograss is a low-maintenance lawn and not a “No”-maintenance lawn.

Buffalograss is an open growing grass that will not shade the soil as well as most of our other turfgrasses. Weeds are often the result. A regular mowing schedule can reduce broadleaf weed problems as most broadleaves cannot survive consistent mowing. Those that do either have a rosette growing pattern (dandelions, shepherds purse) or are “creepers” (henbit, chickweed, spurge). Annual grasses such as crabgrass or foxtail can also be a problem. A good weed preventer (prodiamine, pendimethalin or dithiopyr) may be needed prevent problems.

March

Spot treat broadleaf weeds if necessary. The most important treatment for broadleaf weeds should be in late October to early November well after the buffalograss is dormant. Treatments are much more effective then than in the spring as the weeds are smaller and the weeds are sending energy, as well as the herbicide, to the roots. Treatments in March are to take care of any “escapes” missed in the fall spraying. Spray early enough in March that the buffalograss is still dormant. Look at the base of the plants to make sure there is no green. Treat on a day that is 50 degrees F or warmer. Rain or irrigation within 24 hours of application will reduce effectiveness.  Use a combination product such as Trimec, Weed-B-Gon or Weed-Out. Weed Free Zone is also good and will give quicker results under cool conditions.

April

Apply crabgrass preventer between April 1 and April 15, or apply preventer when the eastern redbud is in full bloom. If using a product with prodiamine (Barricade), apply two weeks earlier.  Crabgrass preventers must be watered in before they will work. Avoid using broadleaf herbicides as the buffalograss is greening up as injury can result. The buffalograss will not be killed but growth will slow making the buffalograss less competitive with weeds.

June

Fertilize with 1 lb. of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet during June. More applications will give a deeper green color, but can encourage weeds. If it is felt that a second application is needed, apply in July.

If grubs have been a problem in the past, apply a product containing imidacloprid by mid July. Imidacloprid can be applied as early as mid May if there are problems with billbugs or May beetle grubs. These products kill the grubs before they cause damage. They are effective and safe but must be watered in before they become active. Again, I would only treat if grubs have been a problem in the past. Note that the whole area may not need to be treated. The beetles that lay the eggs for the grubs are attracted to lights and moist soil and those areas are most likely to be infested.

Late-July through August

If you see grub damage, apply a grub killer. If imidacloprid has been applied or if grubs have not been a problem in the past, this should not be necessary. Grub killers must be watered in immediately.

Late October to Early November

Spray for broadleaf weeds if they are a problem. Look carefully as our winter annuals such as chickweed and henbit are small and easily overlooked. Use a product that contains 2,4-D as it increases effectiveness on dandelions. Treat on a day that is at least 50 degrees F. Rain or irrigation within 24 hours reduces effectiveness. Use the rates listed on the label for all products mentioned.

For more information check out the Buffalograss Lawns Publication at the KSRE Bookstore – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=1447

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

A Homeowner Step-by-Step Guide to Bermudagrass and Zoysiagrass Lawns

(By Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Earlier I posted the Homeowner Step-By-Step Guide to Cool-Season Lawns in Kansas so I decided that it would be good to go ahead and get the warm-season lawn calendar out there for everyone that is manageing zoysiagrass, bermudagrass.

The following is a lawn calendar for zoysiagrass and bermudagrass. Buffalograss, also a warm-season grass, but we will cover that separate because the management of buffalograss is a little different then zoysiagrass and bermudagrass.

For more information check out the Zoyisagrass Lawns Publication at the KSRE Bookstore – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=1451

For more information check out the Bermudagrass Lawns Publication at the KSRE Bookstore – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=586

 

Zoysiagrass and Bermduagrass Lawn Calendar

March
Spot treat broadleaf weeds if necessary. Treat on a day that is 50 degrees F or warmer. Rain or irrigation within 24 hours of application will reduce effectiveness.

April
Apply crabgrass preventer between April 1 and April 15, or apply preventer when the eastern redbud is in full bloom. This year we are getting a little warmer sooner but remember this cold snap that we just had would have killed any crabgrass if it had germinated. If using a product with prodiamine (Barricade), apply two weeks earlier. Crabgrass preventers must be watered in before they will start to work.

May – August 15
Fertilize with 1 lb. of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet per application. Follow the recommendations on the bag. More applications will give a deeper green color, but will increase mowing and may lead to thatch buildup with zoysiagrass. Bermudagrass can also have problems with thatch buildup but thatch is less likely with Bermuda than zoysia. Bermudagrass – Use two to four applications. Zoysiagrass – Use one to two applications. Too much nitrogen leads to thatch buildup.

One Application: Apply in June.
Two Applications: Apply May and July.
Three Applications: Apply May, June, and early August.
Four Applications: Apply May, June, July, and early August.

Remember to look and see if you are using a quick release nitrogen source or a slow release nitrogen source.  If you use a quick release source then it is immediately available but only lasts a couple weeks.  Thats why you would have to make a couple of applications like it is listed above.  If you are going to use a slow release source it will tell you on the bag how long the product will last.  Therefore, you might not have to make as many applications.

So generally you want to use a total of 2 to 4lb. of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet per year for bermudagrass and 1 to 2 lb. of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet per year for zoysiagrass.

June
If grubs have been a problem in the past, apply a product containing imidacloprid by mid July. Imidacloprid can be applied as early as mid May if there are problems with billbugs or May beetle grubs. These products kill the grubs before they cause damage. They are effective and safe but must be watered in before they become active. June is a good time to core aerate a warm-season lawn. Core aeration will help alleviate compaction, increase the rate of water infiltration, improve soil air exchange and help control thatch.


Late-July through August
If you see grub damage, apply a grub killer. If Imidacloprid has been applied, this should not be necessary. Grub killers must be watered in immediately.

Late October
Spray for broadleaf weeds if they are a problem. Treat on a day that is at least 50 degrees F. Rain or irrigation within 24 hours reduces effectiveness. Use the rates listed on the label for all products mentioned.

For more information check out the Zoyisagrass Lawns Publication at the KSRE Bookstore – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=1451

For more information check out the Bermudagrass Lawns Publication at the KSRE Bookstore – https://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu/Item.aspx?catId=545&pubId=586

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @KSUTurf.

Also, visit our facebook page www.facebook.com/KSUTurf

More than you ever want to know about preemergent herbicides

(by Jared Hoyle, KSU Turfgrass Research and Extension)

Ever year I write a blog, a newsletter article, send out a tweet and post on Facebook about applying preemergent herbicides for summer annual grass control. We are typically most concerned with crabgrass so I went back and searched through the blog posts and articles and believe it or not it is all still relevant information! Not much has changed, so for this article I am going to spotlight information across these articles and compare from when I originally wrote it.

Crabgrass emerging in bare ground earlier than turf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Up first, Methods of Predicting Crabgrass Emergence! In this article I go over the different methods to predict when crabgrass emerges; calendar date, soil temperatures, forsythia blooms, growing degree days. Like last year we have had a fluctuating Spring. In the article from March 14, 2017 I stated that it was 80 deg F on the 12th and was snowing just a couple days before. Sound familiar? Refresh yourself on the different methods and know its not too late to get preemergence herbicides out.

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/methods-of-predicting-crabgrass-emergence/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next article is for all you golf course turfgrass managers. Preemergence Weed Control in Bentgrass Putting Greens. This article was also from March 2017 and I went through what preemergent herbicides are available to use on bentgrass putting greens. The list of herbicides was from the Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals 2017 Manual (https://mdc.itap.purdue.edu/item.asp?Item_Number=TURF-100). Going through the 2018 edition…. Guess what again? Not much has changed for use on putting greens but I would encourage you to check out the manual and read the “Tips for Herbicide Use on Golf Course Putting Greens” section on page 108.

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/preemergence-weed-control-in-bentgrass-putting-greens/


And now one of my favorite quotes from Benjamin Franklin “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”. This was the lead in for talking about why preemergent herbicides are worth it! This article talks about what weeds preemergent herbicides work on, how they work, and the growth stages of crabgrass. To “round-up” the article I put a list of options out there, the weeds these preemergent herbicides control and some concerns/comments. One thing that I did not list is the combination products. I only listed the single active ingredients.   There are many combination products as well. (Maybe that will be the next blog post – Combination Preemergent Herbicides.)

https://blogs.k-state.edu/turf/an-ounce-of-prevention-is-worth-a-pound-of-cure-by-benjamin-franklin-that-goes-for-preemergence-herbicides-too/

Always remember to READ THE LABEL for the correct rate, turfgrass tolerance, and specific instructions before application!!!

***Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for identification purposes and does not imply recommendation or endorsement, nor is criticism implied of similar products not mentioned by Kansas State University.***