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Category: Cybersecurity

Updating a security feature in Zoom

Information Technology Services is continually updating the security of the tools we zoomprovide and use. A feature that we are implementing is masking the phone numbers of those who call into Zoom.

What change will you notice? When students, faculty, or staff join the audio portion of a Zoom call (meeting) using a phone, only the first 3 digits (area code) and last 3 digits of their phone number will be displayed. For example, 785****123 will be displayed as the phone number.

This change is being made to avoid unnecessary disclosure of information that a K-Stater may want to be kept private.

NOTE: If individuals want to identify who is in the meeting, the host has the option of renaming the phone caller once they enter the meeting.

AnyConnect VPN client to be retired June 30

Last week notices were emailed to almost 200 individuals who were continuing to use the AnyConnect VPN client. As of June 30, AnyConnect will be turned off and no longer available. If you received the notice, please install GlobalProtect. Once you have tested the GlobalProtect VPN and can use it, then you should uninstall AnyConnect.

For step-by-step instructions on how to install GlobalProtect, go to K-State’s VPN webpage.

Need help? For self-help, view the IT Knowledge Base articles. Need more help, contact the IT Help Desk 785-532-7722 or your local IT support staff.

K-State’s new eID password standards begin April 8

On Wednesday, April 8, K-State’s eID password standards are changing. With these updated standards, most K-Staters will need to change their passwords only one more time and no longer be required to change their eID password every 180 days.

What do I need to do?

When you get the password change reminder email, change your password using the new password standards. Keep the following in mind:

  • If you changed your password before April 8, you will receive a 180-day reminder email and will be required to change your password again. After that password change, you will not need to change your password again unless your password becomes compromised.
  • If you are required to change your password more often because of the job you perform, you will still need to follow those job-specific password guidelines.

Continue reading “K-State’s new eID password standards begin April 8”

Update on Zoom security features

zoomIn the past week, there has been a lot of news coverage regarding Zoom and security. Zoom is considered a best-in-class web conferencing platform because of its ease of use, cross-platform availability, and full features, including chat, screen sharing, recording, audio transcription, and being device-agnostic.

Eric Yuan, Zoom Founder, and CEO, in a message to users, identified security features that Zoom staffers fixed and those Zoom is actively addressing. What Zoom has done includes:

  • Developed a guide to address privacy issues
  • Clarified information on Zoom and encryption
  • Updated and clarified their privacy policy – emphasized that they do not nor have they ever sold user’s data, do not monitor meetings or the contents of meetings, and comply with applicable federal laws including GDPR and CCPA

There is a  pop-up notification from Zoom when new mandatory or optional updates are available.  When you receive a notification, run the update.

Continue reading “Update on Zoom security features”

K-State’s new eID password standards

Currently, K-Staters are required to change their eID password every 180 days. On Wednesday, April 8, K-State’s eID password standards are changing. With these updated standards, most K-Staters will need to change their passwords only one more time.

What do I need to do?

Right now, nothing. Before the change, you received an email every 180 days, reminding you to change your password. After April 8, the next time you get the reminder email, change your password using the new password standards. After that password change, you will not need to change your password again unless your password becomes compromised. Keep the following in mind:

  • If you change your password before April 8, you will receive a 180-day reminder email and will be required to change your password again. After that password change, you will not need to change your password again unless your password becomes compromised.
  • If you are required to change your password more often because of the job you perform, you will still need to follow those job-specific password guidelines.

Continue reading “K-State’s new eID password standards”

Increasing numbers of fraudulent schemes warns FBI and DOJ

The Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) are warning consumers about increasing numbers of fraudulent schemes spoofing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) with information related to COVID-19. In an alert, the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center warns consumers about the various phishing scams, which might be in the form of an email, text or phone call or robocall and associated with the stimulus check (requesting you give your credentials or bank information), information about someone testing positive at K-State, health insurance, selling fake products, etc.

Cybercriminals often take advantage of uncertain times to trick users into responding to an email, text or phone call and divulging sensitive information such as your eID/password, downloading an executable file, downloading an attachment, clicking on a link, sending you to a malicious URL, etc. Be vigilant about communications related to COVID-19.

Continue reading “Increasing numbers of fraudulent schemes warns FBI and DOJ”

ImageNow: Keeping our confidential and proprietary data secure

As we continue to learn, teach, and work remotely, we all need to do our part to keep confidential or proprietary data secure by adhering to K-State’s Data Classification and Security Policy. ImageNow users need to follow the remote work guidelines. Continue reading “ImageNow: Keeping our confidential and proprietary data secure”

Who is listening to your conversations through your smart devices?

While we continue to work and learn from home, it’s important to remember that your “private” conversations may not be so private. We’ve been warned about hackers taking control of cameras on your computer screen, that is still a concern, but hackers are also listening to you via your smart devices. The device itself might not be recording your conversation, but a hacker could be.

As people continue to work from remote locations during the COVID-19 crisis, there has been a significant spike in cybercrime. Hackers know you are home, so they are listening. They could be listening through your smartphones, computers, laptops, tablets, smart TVs, Amazon Alexa, and Echo devices. Or even Google Home, Facebook, thermostats, lights, any third-party apps using the microphone feature, AirPods and AirBuds, and most newer cars. The list goes on and on. Continue reading “Who is listening to your conversations through your smart devices?”

Only use the VPN when necessary

Monday, March 23, K-State will start a new chapter with classes taught remotely for the remainder of the semester. Information Technology Services (ITS) has been working behind the scenes to make sure our systems and services are ready.

We are reminding K-Staters about when to use the Virtual Private Networking (VPN) to access protected, proprietary, and confidential data and campus resources in a secure manner.

Because the VPN connection is shared with all K-Staters, the VPN should only be used when necessary. Disconnect from the VPN when access to protected resources is no longer needed. Remember closing your browser is not enough; you need to actively disconnect from the VPN.

Continue reading “Only use the VPN when necessary”

Beware of scams

K-State often sees an uptick of phishing scams around holidays and spring break, and this one is no exception. We have recently observed stolen credentials being used to target student financial aid, so be especially vigilant about any mail concerning loans and report anything out of the ordinary to the Office of Student Financial Assistance.

Also, cybercriminals are taking advantage of this uncertain time during the spread of the Coronavirus. Remember to be vigilant about communications related to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Phishing emails are being sent with malicious attachments and links to fraudulent websites enticing you to hand over sensitive information. Also, use caution with social media pleas, texts, or calls related to COVID-19.

Continue reading “Beware of scams”